Tag Archives: Natalie Lane

7 safety tips to keep July 4 fun

AUGUSTA, GA. – The Fourth of July is one of America’s favorite holidays. It’s our nation’s birthday, and most people like to top off the celebration with fireworks. Although fireworks are fun and colorful, they can be dangerous to everyone around.

On average, about 200 people will go to the ER with fireworks-related injuries each day around the Fourth of July holiday, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

“Most of the injuries we see involve burns,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital of Georgia Emergency Department. “For example, a sparkler can burn as hot as a blow torch; and, unfortunately, we have had to treat children with sparkler burns several times. But these are avoidable injuries, if families will carefully follow safety procedures.”

Here are some tips Dr. Lane recommends to help keep your July 4 fun:

  1. Always read and follow directions on the label carefully.
  2. Adults should always supervise young children when around fireworks. Even sparklers, which are assumed to be safe, should be supervised, as they can reach to 1000 degrees, and can cause severe burns.
  3. If a firework is deemed a “dud” after not going off once lighted, do not stand near it to see what’s wrong. Instead, wait 15-20 minutes; then put the “dud” out with water and dispose of it.
  4. Never shoot fireworks off in metal or glass containers. Instead light them outdoors on a smooth, flat surface away from homes, leaves, or other flammable materials.
  5. Always keep some type of water source on hand in case of fire. A large bucket of water or garden hose will do the trick.
  6. Light fireworks one at a time. Lighting multiple fireworks simultaneously could result in the person setting the fireworks to catching fire or being hit by a firework that goes off early.
  7. Do not use fireworks where prohibited by law. However, if they are legal in your area, be sure to buy them from a reputable seller.

The 154-bed CHOG is the second-largest children’s hospital in the state, providing the highest level of pediatric critical care and neonatal intensive care, as well as a wide range of general and complex health care for children. Visit CHOG at facebook.com/GAChildrens and twitter.com/GAChildrens

Know your ABCs of pool safety

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Drowning is the number one killer of children under the age of 5.

“What makes this statistic even more tragic is that these young children are more likely to drown in a residential swimming pool than in any other body of water,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Emergency Department at Children’s Hospital of Georgia.

“What we often hear in the emergency room is that a group was gathered at the pool for an event or party, but no one was taking ownership of watching the children in the pool,” said Lane. “Unfortunately, folks think someone else is watching the kids, or falsely assume that everyone is keeping an eye out. This is where the trouble begins.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents avoid installing a swimming pool until children are over age 5. However, if you own a pool, or use one, Lane recommends that you follow the “ABCs” of pool safety:

Abide by the Rules
• Never leave children alone in or near the pool.
• Children should be supervised by an adult who can swim.
• Maintain a clear, unobstructed view of children at all times.
• Do not substitute inflatable flotation devices for approved life vests.
• Keep children from playing or swimming near pool drains, pipes and other openings.
• After your family is done swimming, remove toys and floats from pool area that could attract children to the water.

Be Prepared
• Teach children how to swim; at the very least, they should learn basic water safety tips.
• Parents and caregivers should learn CPR and rescue breathing. The key to better outcomes in near drowning is bystander CPR.
• Don’t panic. If your child is missing, look for him or her in the pool first.
• Formulate an emergency action plan with your children and rehearse each family member’s role.
• Keep a phone available at the poolside in case of emergencies.

Childproof Your Pool

• Install a self-latching and self-closing fence around the pool area. Fences should be at least 4 feet high.
• A safety cover should be placed over the water area when the pool is not in use.
• Keep rescue equipment and emergency phone numbers poolside.
• Install a pool alarm to alert you when children are near the water.
• Have a qualified professional inspect drain suction fittings and covers on a regular basis to ensure they meet current safety standards.

Swimming provides great fun and exercise for kids. But always remember to play it safe during pool time.

The 154-bed CHOG is the second-largest children’s hospital in the state, providing the highest level of pediatric critical care and neonatal intensive care, as well as a wide range of general and complex health care for children. Visit CHOG at facebook.com/GAChildrens and twitter.com/GAChildrens

Pediatric Emergency Department gets a new look

ER renovationsRenovations to the Pediatric Emergency Department were completed in early January, and the changes are more than just cosmetic.

“We increased our capacity by three rooms, and that can make a large difference in the number of patients you are able to treat,” Pediatric Emergency Department Medical Director Dr. Natalie Lane said. “We treat almost 30,000 patients a year, and we needed this expansion to grow.”

The renovations also created new intake and triage procedures that allow the Emergency Department to treat patients more quickly and with greater efficiency.

“We now have a station where a greeter helps the patients register,” Lane said. “Now our nurses can focus more on triage and treatment. Also, we redesigned a preexisting room in the waiting area where we could examine patients faster and get a better idea of what treatment may be needed. Some less severe cases may receive treatment at that point and not even require the use of an emergency bed, which saves rooms for more ill patients and reduces waiting times for all patients.”

The renovation also gives them more flexibility and bigger beds for some patients, which can be important as the Pediatric Emergency Department treats children up to 18 years of age. The new paint, wall protection, and flooring will provide a fresh look for years to come. “We are thrilled to have had the opportunity to make this change for our patients and our staff,” Lane said.

The renovations were not easy, according to Facilities Project Manager Jon Graybeal.

“We tried to do most of the work late at night, hopefully, to disrupt fewer people,” he said. “But it is hard to do that work when the place is always open.”

According to Graybeal, the renovations included new exam rooms, a new entrance, and a repurposing of several areas. The ED also received new furniture, lighting, wiring, paint, flooring, and more.

“We started in July and finished up early this month (January),” he said.

Practice the ABCs of pool safety, pediatric expert says

Summertime is a time for pool parties and water fun, but those activities can be dangerous, especially for children. In fact, drowning is the number one killer of children under the age of 5. What makes this statistic even more tragic is that young children, ages 1 to 4, are more likely to drown in a residential swimming pool than any other body of water.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents avoid installing a swimming pool until children are over age 5.

“However, if you own a pool, or use one, it’s important that you take precautions to help keep your children safe,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital of Georgia Emergency Department. “You should always assign an adult or hire an adult as a lifeguard whose sole job is to monitor activity in the pool.”

Lane offers the following “ABCs” of pool safety:

Abide by the Rules

  • Never leave children alone in or near the pool.
  • Children should be supervised by an adult who can swim.
  • Maintain a clear, unobstructed view of children at all times.
  • Do not substitute inflatable flotation devices for approved life vests.
  • Keep children from playing or swimming near pool drains, pipes and other openings.
  • After your family is done swimming, remove toys and floats from pool area that could attract children to the water.

Be Prepared

  • Teach children how to swim; at the very least, they should learn basic water safety tips.
  • Parents and caregivers should learn CPR and rescue breathing. The key to better outcomes in near drowning is bystander CPR.
  • Don’t panic. If your child is missing, look for him or her in the pool first.
  • Formulate an emergency action plan with your children and rehearse each family member’s role.
  • Keep a phone available at the poolside in case of emergencies.

Childproof Your Pool

  • Install a self-latching and self-closing fence around the pool area. Fences should be at least 4 feet high.
  • A safety cover should be placed over the water area when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep rescue equipment and emergency phone numbers poolside.
  • Install a pool alarm to alert you when children are near the water.
  • Have a qualified professional inspect drain suction fittings and covers on a regular basis to ensure they meet current safety standards.

Swimming provides great fun and exercise for kids. But always remember to play it safe during pool time.

 

Practice the ABCs of pool safety, pediatric expert says

NatalieLaneweb (2)AUGUSTA, Ga. – Summertime is a time for pool parties and water fun, but those activities can be dangerous, especially for children. In fact, drowning is the number one killer of children under the age of 5. What makes this statistic even more tragic is that young children, ages 1 to 4, are more likely to drown in a residential swimming pool than any other body of water.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents avoid installing a swimming pool until children are over age 5.

“However, if you own a pool, or use one, it’s important that you take precautions to help keep your children safe,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital of Georgia Emergency Department. “You should always assign an adult or hire an adult as a lifeguard whose sole job is to monitor activity in the pool.”

Lane offers the following “ABCs” of pool safety:

Abide by the Rules

  • Never leave children alone in or near the pool.
  • Children should be supervised by an adult who can swim.
  • Maintain a clear, unobstructed view of children at all times.
  • Do not substitute inflatable flotation devices for approved life vests.
  • Keep children from playing or swimming near pool drains, pipes and other openings.
  • After your family is done swimming, remove toys and floats from pool area that could attract children to the water.

Be Prepared

  • Teach children how to swim; at the very least, they should learn basic water safety tips.
  • Parents and caregivers should learn CPR and rescue breathing. The key to better outcomes in near drowning is bystander CPR.
  • Don’t panic. If your child is missing, look for him or her in the pool first.
  • Formulate an emergency action plan with your children and rehearse each family member’s role.
  • Keep a phone available at the poolside in case of emergencies.

Childproof Your Pool

  • Install a self-latching and self-closing fence around the pool area. Fences should be at least 4 feet high.
  • A safety cover should be placed over the water area when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep rescue equipment and emergency phone numbers poolside.
  • Install a pool alarm to alert you when children are near the water.
  • Have a qualified professional inspect drain suction fittings and covers on a regular basis to ensure they meet current safety standards.

Swimming provides great fun and exercise for kids. But always remember to play it safe during pool time.