Tag Archives: Marc Miller

Committee continues search for Hull dean

The search continues for a new dean of the James M. Hull College of Business, and the mission is clear: find the right person for the job.

Finding someone who can not only perform the required duties of the position, but also live up to the impressive standard set by former dean Dr. Marc Miller, however, may prove difficult.

It is for that reason the search committee has reached out to Parker Executive Search, a leading global retained executive search firm with a proven record of filling executive positions with qualified individuals. If the name sounds familiar, it’s because you’ve heard it before – Parker Executive Search was the same firm that ran GRU’s latest presidential search.

“The Hull College of Business offers us a powerful presence in the Augusta community in terms of cultivating an understanding of healthy economic environments,” said Dr. Zach Kelehear, dean of the College of Education, who is chairing the search committee. “We are eager to find a person who understands scholarship, research and effective teaching as well as the significant space that the college occupies in the CSRA community.”

Earlier this year, Miller left his position as dean when he was named Georgia Regents University’s Director of Economic Development and Entrepreneurial Engagement.

In order to ensure the university finds the best individual for the job, the search committee is asking for your help in the form of recommendations. If you know of a candidate qualified for this position, please forward all recommendations to:

Jacob Anderson, Associate

Parker Executive Search

janderson@parkersearch.com

770-804-1996, ext. 111

A detailed explanation of what the position entails can be [found here].

Provost’s Perspective: New Leadership

First of all, let me take a moment to welcome everyone to the campus of Georgia Regents University and the start of the new academic year. Not only am I excited to see our returning students and the energy they bring as they pursue their academic goals, I am deeply honored that so many freshmen and their families have entrusted their university experience to GRU. More and more, we’re becoming a destination of choice for the best and brightest, not just here in the CSRA, but also in Georgia, the nation and even the world.

The start of the fall semester is also a time to reconnect with the faculty and staff who have chosen GRU as the place to put their special skills to use. We know there is great demand for the level of talent we’re recruiting across all our ranks, and I am grateful that so many wonderful colleagues continue to commit their time and expertise to GRU.

Of course, the excitement that came earlier this summer with Dr. Brooks Keel being tapped as the next president of GRU and CEO of GRHealth has been palpable. Dr. Keel has a thorough understanding of biomedical research, a track record of visionary leadership and a history with our legacy institutions that is second to none. As I’ve watched him meet with deans and faculty, students and staff, I’ve been impressed by his warmth and his ability to connect with the people within those positions.

It is indeed an exciting time to be at GRU.

And Dr. Keel is not the only new face who will have an impact on our organization. Indeed, we have recruited several talented individuals to fill other key roles in our university.

Undoubtedly, the person blessed with the best name is Dr. Quincy Byrdsong, our inaugural vice president for academic planning and strategic initiatives. Coming to us from Virginia Commonwealth University, he will be quarterbacking those complex initiatives that require great coordination and interaction with the colleges and different structural units. He will aid us all in ensuring that we have rigor and structure around our academic planning. Though we’ve always been conscious of that need, we feel he is perfectly suited to help colleges, departments, and faculty start framing the academic planning process even earlier, allowing us to consider the “what ifs” surrounding the development of, say, a particular program or major before the time comes to pitch it to those at a higher administration level.

Quincy also will take over some of the operational units that we see as being key to our strategic initiatives. Most visibly, as chief diversity officer, Quincy will also have responsibility for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, an office that is very important to me personally and one that continues to be a national model. While the vice president for academic planning and strategic initiatives is new to GRU, it was developed to fulfill a number of critical functions for the institution, and it actually helped streamline our leadership ranks, since three previous positions – two active and one we were searching for – are being filled by this one role.

Dr. Zach Kelehear, our new dean of the College of Education, has only been on the job since July 1, but already he has started making strong, important connections throughout the community by reaching out to the schools, principals and superintendents in our regional education service area. Not only that, but his interaction with the faculty is already creating valuable and innovative ideas. The University of South Carolina’s loss is definitely our gain. And, if you want to start a conversation and see a gleam in Zach’s eyes, just ask him about another of his passions – beekeeping.

Speaking of the College of Education, former dean Dr. Cindi Chance continues to “fail retirement” and has agreed to return and offer her special leadership abilities to the Confucius Institute as its director. Her intense interest in global education in general and China in particular make her a natural to guide the Confucius Institute to the next stage of its existence at GRU.

I also want to take this opportunity to say a special thank you to Dr. Joe Tsien, for his pivotal work in developing and launching the Confucius Institute as its founding director. With the Institute now on strong footing, Joe, a world-renowned neuroscientist, felt it was a perfect time to focus more fully on his true passion – doing basic research in brain science.

We’re also proud that Joanne Sexton has moved into the role of Cyber Institute director. Not only does she have experience as an information technology expert for the U.S. Navy, but she has a deep understanding of our cyber education initiatives. The new institute is certainly in good hands.

And over in the Hull College of Business, we have the transition of Dean Marc Miller into the newly created role of executive director for economic development and entrepreneurial engagement. Entrepreneurship, economic development and community engagement are increasingly important institutional priorities, and we look forward to significant advances through Marc’s work in his new role. The national search for business dean will begin in the next few weeks, and I very much appreciate Mark Thompson’s service as interim dean until the position is filled.

Research administration is fortunate to have a familiar face in a new role – Dr. Alvin Terry joins SVP for Research Michael Diamond and adds strength to this critical unit as associate vice president for basic sciences. Alvin provides administrative oversight for lab animal services, as well as a number of other critical responsibilities.

And as an example of our continuing emphasis on enhancing student services at all levels, we’re happy to welcome David Barron, who, as associate vice president for enrollment services, will be over recruitment, admissions and financial aid, areas which are absolutely essential to our success.

This list is in no way comprehensive, nor does it adequately describe the intentional eye with which we’re considering our challenges. It’s simply a brief selection from a very long list of great people doing great things at our institution, and I hope to highlight more as the months go on. Please know that everyone’s efforts are valued and everyone’s dedication to our shared goal is admired. The success of Georgia Regents University requires all of us to give our best, and I’m confident our students, our patients and our community will receive no less.

A Return to Brotherhood: Renewing GRU’s Pi Kappa Phi chapter

11_Fanning_2On December 10, 1904, history was made at the College of Charleston. At the time, however, few knew what they were witnessing.

At an intimate meeting of minds, Andrew Alexander Kroeg Jr., Lawrence Harry Mixson and Simon Fogarty Jr., a senior, junior and sophomore, respectively, came together to found what would someday become one of the academic world’s most well-known and respected fraternities: Pi Kappa Phi.

Today, Pi Kappa Phi has 179 chapters across the United States. Now, a group of enterprising students is looking to make that an even 180. Their goal? To recharter Pi Kappa Phi at Georgia Regents University.

Jessica Rothenheber, coordinator of Greek life and student organizations, has worked closely with the Star and Lamp Society, the student organization working to restore GRU’s lost charter. She said the rechartering process has gone smoothly so far, but the hardest work is still ahead of the Star and Lamp.

“As of right now, Pi Kappa Phi is working with the Interfraternity Council to become a recognized fraternity on campus,” said Rothenheber. “After Pi Kappa Phi Headquarters makes a formal presentation, the IFC will vote on allowing the fraternity to recharter on campus. That’s when the real work begins.”

If the IFC approves Pi Kappa Phi’s request to recharter, the Star and Lamp Society will officially become an Associate Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi. Then, after three semesters, if all goes well, GRU will have a full Pi Kappa Phi chapter. During that time, the chapter will work to actively recruit, a process that is difficult and much-maligned in popular media.

Scott Wallace, dean of student life, said he’s hopeful the chapter will succeed.

“I am very hopeful that it will be successful,” he said. “We need to grow both the number of students in Greek organizations and the number of organizations available to our students. This is definitely an exciting time at GRU, particularly as it relates to Greek life.”

Rothenheber mirrored Wallace’s sentiments, saying she believed Pi Kappa Phi could prove an asset to GRU Greek culture.

“I have really enjoyed working both with the students and the Headquarters staff,” she said. “I believe Pi Kappa Phi will make a great addition to this Greek community.”

If past successes are any indication, there’s strong evidence to support that belief.

Shawn Vincent, vice president of partnerships, international healthcare and strategic affiliations, said his time as a brother of Augusta College’s chapter of Pi Kappa Phi was an unforgettable experience.

“When I was discharged from the United States Marine Corps, I immediately enrolled in Augusta College,” he said. “Although I was a little older than my peers, I was welcomed by a group of outstanding young men into the campus community.”

Vincent served as president of his pledge class, and later as archon (chapter president) of the Gamma Psi chapter. Vincent, a legacy of Pi Kappa Phi, said he followed in the footsteps of his father and brother, also fraternity brothers.

But for Vincent, Pi Kappa Phi was more than just a college tradition. He said it was a true brotherhood, and one that has stayed with him his entire life.

“The development of a lifelong brotherhood seemed far-fetched to me back then, but I must admit that I stay in touch with the majority of brothers who were in my chapter,” said Vincent. “We were a diverse group of young men held together by a singular, common bond.”

That bond, Vincent said, was a focus on being a good citizen.

“The fraternity focused on developing future leaders who were committed to serving others,” he said. “There was an expectation that each member would exemplify accountability, personal responsibility, campus involvement, loyalty and what was needed to be a responsible citizen.”

As a young man, Vincent said he faced many challenges running the 15_assist_off_qtsGamma Psi chapter, but that serving in a leadership capacity proved a great opportunity for him to develop and learn what worked and what didn’t in an organization. He hopes that lesson will carry over into the new chapter should it succeed.

Other notable GRU Pi Kappa Phi brothers include Dr. Marc Miller, dean of the Hull College of Business, and Dr. Brooks Keel, president of GRU and CEO of Georgia Regents Health System.

According to Rothenheber, Pi Kappa Phi Headquarters will make its formal presentation to the IFC on Aug. 20. She said she’s hopeful that GRU will have an Associate Chapter as early as September.

Miller chosen for new business role

AUGUSTA, Ga. — Marc Miller, Dean of the James M. Hull College of Business at Georgia Regents University, has been named GRU’s Executive Director of Economic Development and Entrepreneurial Engagement. He will begin this new role Aug. 1, and Hull College’s Associate Dean Mark Thompson will begin serving as the business school’s interim dean. A national search for the dean position is set to begin in August with the new academic year.

MarcMiller“Dr. Miller has been an integral part of the institution’s success for more than 15 years, and I believe this director position will be a seamless transition for him,” said Gretchen Caughman, GRU’s Interim President and Provost. “With his strong background in business administration and management, I am confident Dr. Miller will continue GRU’s reputation for excellence.”

Miller is charged with fostering economic development by expanding university relationships with off-campus communities. He will also be responsible for creating a culture of entrepreneurship and innovation within the institution’s research and academic programs.

Miller joined GRU in 2000 as an Associate Professor of Business Administration and, after six years of serving in this capacity, became the dean of the business school.

Through his leadership, Miller secured millions of dollars in major gifts that led to not only the naming of the college after philanthropist James M. Hull, but also the establishment of the university’s Knox School of Accountancy in honor of the late businessman Peter S. Knox III.

Miller is credited for Hull College’s ranking as one of the nation’s top business schools by the prestigious The Princeton Review and its distinguished accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). In addition, Miller supervised the development of GRU’s first health and science related business dual degree programs – the M.D./M.B.A. degree and the STEM-MBA Option.

Miller is an award-winning researcher with published works in the Journal of Distance Learning Administration, Interactive Business Communication Exercises and Computers in Human Behavior.

He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration at Augusta College before it became a part of Georgia Regents University. He also received a doctorate from Auburn University in management information systems.

Hull College named a top business school

Princeton Review logoThe James M. Hull College of Business at Georgia Regents University has been recognized a 6th time as one of the nation’s top business schools in The Princeton Review’s “The Best 295 Business Schools: 2014 Edition.”

Business schools are ranked annually based on an assessment of their academic programs and offerings, review of institutional data, and a survey of 23,000 students.

“We are very pleased that the Princeton Review has again recognized our outstanding academic programs,” said Marc Miller, Dean of the Hull College of Business. “Our faculty and staff are deeply committed to quality programming and the academic and career success of our students. This prestigious recognition affirms that commitment.”

The publication also highlights students’ opinions on each ranked school. GRU students agree that the Hull College provides “solid preparation” in accounting and management and say that the school is recognized for strengths in economics, finance, accounting, and “certain quantitative-based courses such as market research.”

“We recommend Georgia Regents University’s Hull College as one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school degree,” said Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior Vice President of Publishing.

“The Best 295 Business Schools: 2014 Edition” profiles each school on academics, student life, and admissions and rates their academics, selectivity, and career placement services. It does not rank the business schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 295 or name one business school best overall.

GRU offers new M.D./M.B.A. Dual Degree

As the demand for business-savvy physicians continues to grow, the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRU’s James M. Hull College of Business have teamed up to offer a new M.D./M.B.A. degree .

According to Marc Miller, Dean of the Hull College of Business, and Dr. Peter F. Buckley, Dean of the Medical College of Georgia, the five-year degree program, which begins this fall, is designed to expand the academic diversity of physician graduates entering the workforce.

“I believe this dual degree program will truly help our institution produce physicians who are not only passionate about their patients, but also are great business leaders in the medical field,” said Miller. “With the rigorous curriculum being taught by highly skilled professors, we know our graduates will be better equipped to meet the future challenges of the health care industry.”

“This program will educate a cadre of future physician leaders,” said Dr. Paul M. Wallach, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs for the Medical College of Georgia. “The traditional role of physicians is changing; the health care industry is increasingly complex; and one result is a growing need for physicians who also have strong management and leadership skills, a knowledge of health care economics, and a better understanding of the health care system.  Our M.D./M.B.A. program will equip our students with the in-depth knowledge they need to both provide outstanding clinical care and lead within a complex health care system,” he said.

Eligible participants must be MCG students who are then accepted into the M.B.A. program after their third year of medical school. The final two years of the five-year dual degree will consist of students completing classes for both medical and business school.

For more information, call the Hull College of Business at 706-737-1418 or the MCG Curriculum Office at 706-721-3217.

GRU offers new M.D./M.B.A. Dual Degree

GRUU_vertical_2Csolid

AUGUSTA, Ga. – As the demand for business-savvy physicians continues to grow,  the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRU’s James M. Hull College of Business have teamed up to offer a new joint M.D./M.B.A. degree.

According to Marc Miller, Dean of the Hull College of Business, and Paul Wallach, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at MCG, the five-year degree program that  begins this fall  is designed to expand the academic diversity of physician graduates entering the workforce.

“I believe this dual degree program will truly help our institution produce physicians who are not only passionate about their patients, but also are great business leaders in the medical field,” said Miller. “With the rigorous curriculum being taught by highly skilled professors, we know our graduates will be better equipped to meet the future challenges of the health care industry.”

“This program will educate a cadre of future physician leaders,” said Wallach. “The traditional role of physicians is changing. The health care industry is increasingly complex, and one result is a growing need for physicians who also have strong management and leadership skills, a knowledge of health care economics, and a better understanding of the health care system.  Our M.D./M.B.A. program will equip our students with the in-depth knowledge they need to both provide outstanding clinical care and lead within a complex health care system,” he said.

Eligible participants must be MCG students who are then accepted into the M.B.A. program after their third year of medical school. The final two years of the five-year dual degree will consist of students completing classes for both medical and business school.

For more information, call the Hull College of Business at 706-737-1418 or the MCG Curriculum Office at 706-721-3217.

 ###

 Georgia Regents University is one of four public comprehensive research universities in the state with nearly 10,000 students enrolled in its nine colleges and schools, which include the Medical College of Georgia – the nation’s 13th-oldest medical school – the nationally-ranked Hull College of Business and Georgia’s only College of Dental Medicine. The clinical enterprise associated with the university includes the 478-bed Georgia Regents Medical Center and the 154-bed Children’s Hospital of Georgia. GRU is a unit of the University System of Georgia and an equal opportunity institution.  http://www.gru.edu

GRU offers new M.D./M.B.A. Dual Degree

GRUU_vertical_2Csolid

AUGUSTA, Ga. – As the demand for business-savvy physicians continues to grow,  the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRU’s James M. Hull College of Business have teamed up to offer a new joint M.D./M.B.A. degree.

According to Marc Miller, Dean of the Hull College of Business, and Paul Wallach, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at MCG, the five-year degree program that  begins this fall  is designed to expand the academic diversity of physician graduates entering the workforce.

“I believe this dual degree program will truly help our institution produce physicians who are not only passionate about their patients, but also are great business leaders in the medical field,” said Miller. “With the rigorous curriculum being taught by highly skilled professors, we know our graduates will be better equipped to meet the future challenges of the health care industry.”

“This program will educate a cadre of future physician leaders,” said Wallach. “The traditional role of physicians is changing. The health care industry is increasingly complex, and one result is a growing need for physicians who also have strong management and leadership skills, a knowledge of health care economics, and a better understanding of the health care system.  Our M.D./M.B.A. program will equip our students with the in-depth knowledge they need to both provide outstanding clinical care and lead within a complex health care system,” he said.

Eligible participants must be MCG students who are then accepted into the M.B.A. program after their third year of medical school. The final two years of the five-year dual degree will consist of students completing classes for both medical and business school.

For more information, call the Hull College of Business at 706-737-1418 or the MCG Curriculum Office at 706-721-3217.

 ###

 Georgia Regents University is one of four public comprehensive research universities in the state with nearly 10,000 students enrolled in its nine colleges and schools, which include the Medical College of Georgia – the nation’s 13th-oldest medical school – the nationally-ranked Hull College of Business and Georgia’s only College of Dental Medicine. The clinical enterprise associated with the university includes the 478-bed Georgia Regents Medical Center and the 154-bed Children’s Hospital of Georgia. GRU is a unit of the University System of Georgia and an equal opportunity institution.  http://www.gru.edu

GRU offers new M.D./M.B.A. Dual Degree

GRUU_vertical_2Csolid

AUGUSTA, Ga. – As the demand for business-savvy physicians continues to grow,  the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRU’s James M. Hull College of Business have teamed up to offer a new joint M.D./M.B.A. degree.

According to Marc Miller, Dean of the Hull College of Business, and Paul Wallach, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at MCG, the five-year degree program that  begins this fall  is designed to expand the academic diversity of physician graduates entering the workforce.

“I believe this dual degree program will truly help our institution produce physicians who are not only passionate about their patients, but also are great business leaders in the medical field,” said Miller. “With the rigorous curriculum being taught by highly skilled professors, we know our graduates will be better equipped to meet the future challenges of the health care industry.”

“This program will educate a cadre of future physician leaders,” said Wallach. “The traditional role of physicians is changing. The health care industry is increasingly complex, and one result is a growing need for physicians who also have strong management and leadership skills, a knowledge of health care economics, and a better understanding of the health care system.  Our M.D./M.B.A. program will equip our students with the in-depth knowledge they need to both provide outstanding clinical care and lead within a complex health care system,” he said.

Eligible participants must be MCG students who are then accepted into the M.B.A. program after their third year of medical school. The final two years of the five-year dual degree will consist of students completing classes for both medical and business school.

For more information, call the Hull College of Business at 706-737-1418 or the MCG Curriculum Office at 706-721-3217.

 ###

 Georgia Regents University is one of four public comprehensive research universities in the state with nearly 10,000 students enrolled in its nine colleges and schools, which include the Medical College of Georgia – the nation’s 13th-oldest medical school – the nationally-ranked Hull College of Business and Georgia’s only College of Dental Medicine. The clinical enterprise associated with the university includes the 478-bed Georgia Regents Medical Center and the 154-bed Children’s Hospital of Georgia. GRU is a unit of the University System of Georgia and an equal opportunity institution.  http://www.gru.edu