Tag Archives: Healthy Respect

Call for Healthy Respect Award nominations

Civil Rights Leader Martin Luther King Jr. once said “The time is always right to do the right thing,” and Georgia Regents University takes pride in its efforts of promoting a culture of civility.

GRU’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Healthy Respect Committee want to recognize our employees and students who are putting this mission into practice in their academic, workplace, or patient-care environments. If you would like to nominate someone for the Healthy Respect Award, visit gru.edu/diversity/healthyrespect and click the Civility in Action link.

Nominations are due by Oct. 31, 2014, and the first 50 people to submit a nominee will receive a free Healthy Respect T-shirt.

GRU’s Healthy Respect award will be presented at the end of each academic semester, though anyone from GRU, Georgia Regents Medical Center, or Georgia Regents Medical Associates can be nominated. The first winner will be named this fall.

“At GRU, we are committed to developing a culture that encourages our employees, students, patients, and friends to interact with each other in a positive and respectable manner,” said Jim Rush, GRU Chief Integrity Officer. “Those who are going above and beyond in fostering this type of environment should be recognized for their efforts in making GRU, GR Medical Center and GR Medical Associates a great place to learn, work, and visit .”

Be sure to also view the other features highlighted on the university’s new Healthy Respect website and feel free to take the pledge to support and promote an environment of respect and dignity at GRU.

Healthy Respect Charter placed in offices on campus

Healthy Respect charterThe Healthy Respect charter, the guiding document of Georgia Regents University’s Healthy Respect Project, will soon be placed in offices on both the Summerville and Health Sciences campuses. The first step in a long list of planned changes, making the charters visible is an effort to renew GRU’s commitment to creating and maintaining a culture of civility and professionalism.

Healthy Respect, an enterprise-wide educational and awareness project, underwent a 10-month process to ensure its alignment with GRU’s Transition Forward strategic priorities. The project’s outcomes include fostering a community that is characterized by respect and professionalism; decreasing absenteeism, turnover, and time lost in productivity resulting from disruptive behaviors; and increasing policies and procedures that promote a culture of civility.

Kent Guion, Vice President of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, said hanging the charters opens the way for the university to move forward with the project.

“Our goal now, as before, is to cultivate and maintain a culture of civility by encouraging positive dialogue during the transitional process,” Guion said. “In the future, we hope to make smaller versions of the charter available to everyone so that our commitment is always in the forefront of people’s minds.”

As the initiative continues to take shape, the next step in the process is to create subcommittees to assist in implementing the project. According to Guion, these committees, which will include 10 to 15 people, will seek expanded faculty, staff, student, and employee involvement.

“We want everyone to feel like they have a voice, and a voice that matters,” Guion said. “By creating a proactive system with a civil and upbeat approach, we hope to foster a more respectful and professional work environment.”

Following the creation of subcommittees, the Healthy Respect project also will seek to create a web presence, create guideline manuals, and offer various training opportunities.

The project, coordinated through the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, will consist of a broad-based core team of staff, faculty, and students charged with implementing the initiative.

 

HEALTHY RESPECT

A Commitment to a Culture of Civility

At Georgia Regents University and Georgia Regents Health System we embrace civility as the commitment to engage with others in the most positive, respectful manner, even when there is genuine disagreement.

PREAMBLE

Civil and respectful treatment is a fundamental requirement in our academic, social and patient care environments.  We maintain that the highest level of professional behavior is an uncompromising standard of excellence that should be modeled in all of our interactions.

 

OUR PLEDGE

We support and promote a culture of respect and dignity towards all members of our community. It is our obligation to confront disrespectful conduct and report the incident to the appropriate authority in a timely manner. We agree to promote awareness and education of civility and to foster “healthy respect” throughout Georgia Regents University and Georgia Regents Health System.

GRU signs Healthy Respect charter

charter signingAchieving an environment of uncompromising respect that clearly articulates the processes required to build a culture of a zero tolerance philosophy for unprofessional, harassing, or disrespectful behaviors is the primary focus of a new GRU initiative. The initiative, Healthy Respect Project, received final approval from university leadership and Deans from the nine colleges by the signing of a charter.

“This is a historic moment. This has been a well-planned, evidenced- based process,” said Kent Guion, Vice President of the Office of   Diversity and Inclusion.

Healthy Respect, an enterprise-wide educational and awareness project, underwent a ten-month process to ensure its alignment with GRU’s Transformation 2020 strategic priorities. The project’s outcomes include a community that is characterized by respect and professionalism, of more respectful and professional individuals; a decrease in absenteeism, turnover, and time lost in productivity resulting from disruptive behaviors; and increased policies and procedures that promote a culture of civility.

“We really want this to be an embraceable project and to receive participation throughout the enterprise,” said Guion.

As the initiative continues to take shape, the next step in the process is to create sub-committees to assist with implementing the project. According to Guion, the committees also will look for expanded faculty, staff, student, and employee involvement.

The Healthy Respect project will be coordinated through the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and will consist of a broad-based core team of staff, faculty, and students charged with implementing the initiative.