Tag Archives: Emergency Medicine

Medical Association of Georgia honors MCG physicians’ humanitarian efforts

sharon_ted_kuhnDrs. W. Ted Kuhn and Sharon C. Kuhn were honored as the recipients of the Jack A. Raines Humanitarian Award for 2013 during the Medical Association of Georgia’s 159th House of Delegates meeting Oct. 19 for their outstanding humanitarian contributions beyond the normal practice of medicine.

Ted Kuhn is the professor of emergency medicine and an associate professor of pediatrics at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University, while Sharon Kuhn is an associate professor in the MCG Department of Family Medicine.

In nominating the husband and wife for the award, the Richmond County Medical Society said that Ted and Sharon Kuhn “exemplify the criteria for the award having made outstanding contributions to their fellow man across the globe and at home for numerous years.”

“Both Dr. Kuhns have a deep devotion to serving the underprivileged around the globe. They have served as co-medical directors of the Mission to the World of the Presbyterian Church in America since 2000. Together they have led nearly 100 international medical mission trips and served as liaison to the government of Bangladesh to organize programs for the prevention, identification and treatment of tuberculosis in southwest Bangladesh,” the society said.

“Dr. Ted Kuhn has served as team leader on international medicine trips on more than 50 occasions to locations such as Bangladesh, Peru, Guatemala, Mexico, Cambodia, Trinidad, Ethiopia, Bulgaria, Colombia, Senegal, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Myanmar, and East Asia.”

“Dr. Sharon Kuhn began her international efforts early in her career – interspersing multi-year mission trips to Bangladesh while working on her residency. She has led international medicine efforts in the mountains and jungles of Peru, aided disaster relief victims in the aftermath of an earthquake in Turkey, cared for street children in the Philippines, and aided the people of South India, Iran, Ethiopia and Cambodia,” the society said.

With more than 7,400 members, MAG is the leading voice for the medical profession in Georgia – which includes physicians in every specialty and every practice setting. MAG membership has increased by more than 35 percent since 2010. Go to www.mag.org for additional information.

MAG Immediate Past President and 1999 MCG Graduate Dr. W. Scott Bohlke and Dr. Peter F. Buckley

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South Korean health officials visit Augusta Monday to discuss Disaster Preparedness

Officials from the Korean Ministry of Health will visit the Augusta area Monday, Sept. 23 to learn more about disaster preparedness, including the threat of smaller or improvised nuclear attacks that surfaced in the aftermath of the Cold War.

Six leaders, including Soo Yeop Hyun, Director of the ministry’s Division of Emergency Care, will visit the Georgia Regents University Health Sciences Campus, the Augusta Fire Department and the Columbia County Emergency Management Agency.

The South Korean team is making similar fact-finding visits to Atlanta and Washington, D.C., as part of an ongoing initiative to optimize the country’s preparedness for manmade and natural disasters, said Dr. Phillip Coule, Vice Chairman of Business Development in the Medical College of Georgia Department of Emergency Medicine and Hospitalist Services and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Disaster Life Support Foundation, Inc., which is based on the GRU campus.

“South Korea is a strong partner in the increasingly global initiative to maximize response to and recovery from natural and manmade disasters,” Coule said.

The NDLS Foundation oversees a series of educational programs that better prepare health care professionals and emergency response personnel for mass casualty events. Courses are comprehensive, all-hazards, and multi-disciplinary and were developed by MCG, the University of Georgia, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and Texas A&M School of Public Health.

MCG and the NDLS Foundation have worked with Seoul National University Hospital for more than five years and currently operate five training centers in South Korea, Coule said. Additionally, Korean emergency medical services personnel regularly complete training in Augusta.

“It’s been as mutually beneficial relationship as our Asian colleagues have provided feedback that has assisted ongoing efforts to improve disaster response programs,” Coule said.

During this Augusta visit, Korean Ministry of Health officials will visit the Emergency Department at GR Health System as well as a decontamination facility on the campus. They’ll discuss issues such as the best approaches to stockpiling supplies in light of the reality that a nation’s largest cities are the likeliest targets for attack, Coule said. They’ll also discuss maximizing human survival in the aftermath of smaller nuclear attacks.

The recent North Korean nuclear threat along with the tragedy at the Boston Marathon were the focus of the NDLS Annual Meeting this summer cosponsored by MCG and the nonprofit NDLS Foundation. The meeting provided an opportunity for responders such as firefighters, physicians, paramedics, social workers and military personnel, to learn more about optimal disaster response.

Practice the ABCs of pool safety, pediatric expert says

NatalieLaneweb (2)AUGUSTA, Ga. – Summertime is a time for pool parties and water fun, but those activities can be dangerous, especially for children. In fact, drowning is the number one killer of children under the age of 5. What makes this statistic even more tragic is that young children, ages 1 to 4, are more likely to drown in a residential swimming pool than any other body of water.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents avoid installing a swimming pool until children are over age 5.

“However, if you own a pool, or use one, it’s important that you take precautions to help keep your children safe,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital of Georgia Emergency Department. “You should always assign an adult or hire an adult as a lifeguard whose sole job is to monitor activity in the pool.”

Lane offers the following “ABCs” of pool safety:

Abide by the Rules

  • Never leave children alone in or near the pool.
  • Children should be supervised by an adult who can swim.
  • Maintain a clear, unobstructed view of children at all times.
  • Do not substitute inflatable flotation devices for approved life vests.
  • Keep children from playing or swimming near pool drains, pipes and other openings.
  • After your family is done swimming, remove toys and floats from pool area that could attract children to the water.

Be Prepared

  • Teach children how to swim; at the very least, they should learn basic water safety tips.
  • Parents and caregivers should learn CPR and rescue breathing. The key to better outcomes in near drowning is bystander CPR.
  • Don’t panic. If your child is missing, look for him or her in the pool first.
  • Formulate an emergency action plan with your children and rehearse each family member’s role.
  • Keep a phone available at the poolside in case of emergencies.

Childproof Your Pool

  • Install a self-latching and self-closing fence around the pool area. Fences should be at least 4 feet high.
  • A safety cover should be placed over the water area when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep rescue equipment and emergency phone numbers poolside.
  • Install a pool alarm to alert you when children are near the water.
  • Have a qualified professional inspect drain suction fittings and covers on a regular basis to ensure they meet current safety standards.

Swimming provides great fun and exercise for kids. But always remember to play it safe during pool time.

Practice the ABCs of pool safety, pediatric expert says

NatalieLaneweb (2)AUGUSTA, Ga. – Summertime is a time for pool parties and water fun, but those activities can be dangerous, especially for children. In fact, drowning is the number one killer of children under the age of 5. What makes this statistic even more tragic is that young children, ages 1 to 4, are more likely to drown in a residential swimming pool than any other body of water.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents avoid installing a swimming pool until children are over age 5.

“However, if you own a pool, or use one, it’s important that you take precautions to help keep your children safe,” said Dr. Natalie Lane, Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital of Georgia Emergency Department. “You should always assign an adult or hire an adult as a lifeguard whose sole job is to monitor activity in the pool.”

Lane offers the following “ABCs” of pool safety:

Abide by the Rules

  • Never leave children alone in or near the pool.
  • Children should be supervised by an adult who can swim.
  • Maintain a clear, unobstructed view of children at all times.
  • Do not substitute inflatable flotation devices for approved life vests.
  • Keep children from playing or swimming near pool drains, pipes and other openings.
  • After your family is done swimming, remove toys and floats from pool area that could attract children to the water.

Be Prepared

  • Teach children how to swim; at the very least, they should learn basic water safety tips.
  • Parents and caregivers should learn CPR and rescue breathing. The key to better outcomes in near drowning is bystander CPR.
  • Don’t panic. If your child is missing, look for him or her in the pool first.
  • Formulate an emergency action plan with your children and rehearse each family member’s role.
  • Keep a phone available at the poolside in case of emergencies.

Childproof Your Pool

  • Install a self-latching and self-closing fence around the pool area. Fences should be at least 4 feet high.
  • A safety cover should be placed over the water area when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep rescue equipment and emergency phone numbers poolside.
  • Install a pool alarm to alert you when children are near the water.
  • Have a qualified professional inspect drain suction fittings and covers on a regular basis to ensure they meet current safety standards.

Swimming provides great fun and exercise for kids. But always remember to play it safe during pool time.

Sattin to co-chair scientific program committee for World Safety Conference

richardsattinweb[1]Dr. Richard W. Sattin, an expert in injury prevention and treatment and Research Director for the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University, will co-chair the Scientific Program Committee for the 2014 World Safety Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion.

The conference, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Injury Center, Emory Center for Injury Control and the Johns Hopkins International Injury Prevention Research Unit, will be held Oct. 19-23, 2014 in Atlanta. It will be the 12th in a series of global safety conferences sanctioned by the International Organizing Committee, which is comprised of past organizers of the world conferences and supported by the World Health Organization Department of Violence and Injury Prevention. The WHO initiated the world safety conferences.

Sattin is President of the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research and a member of the CDC’s Core Violence and Injury Prevention Program Evaluation Expert Panel and National Expert Panel on Field Triage. He is a member of the National Association of EMS Physicians Public Health and Research Committees and the American Public Health Association.

An internist with expertise in preventive medicine, Sattin came to MCG in 2006 from the CDC where he was Associate Director for Science, Division of Injury Response, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, for five years.