Tag Archives: Confucius Institute

Confucius Institute to host Moon Festival

 

 

People in the Augusta area may share in a taste of Chinese culture as Georgia Regents University celebrates the Moon Festival and Confucius Institute Day on Oct. 1.

“The Moon Festival and Confucius Institute Day will be a fun family event where people can learn a new tradition,” Confucius Institute Director Dr. Cindi Chance said. “It’s a unique way of celebrating family, and it’s very much like our American Thanksgiving.”

The free event will feature traditional Chinese music and dance, including the lion dance. The lion is an important Chinese legend, a symbol of power, majesty and courage, capable of warding off evil spirits. A Chinese lantern parade will traverse the Summerville campus.

People are encouraged to bring homemade lanterns to the parade and enter them in the lantern competition. Lanterns should be illuminated, but no flames are allowed. Judges will give $100 awards for biggest lantern, most creative and most culturally relevant. The best lantern out of these three will earn its maker a cultural gift.

People will also have a chance to taste Chinese moon cakes, and moon pies will be served.

“We will have one table that will have moon cakes and hot tea and another that will have moon pies and lemonade,” Chance said.

The Moon Festival and Confucius Institute Day celebration will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1, at the D. Doug Bernard Jr. Amphitheatre on the Summerville campus. In case of rain, the festival will be held in the JSAC ballroom.

To register for the lantern contest, please e-mail Yilin Lou at ylou@gru.edu. The first 100 people who register will receive a free lantern and light. The first 200 will receive a free light.

GRU Confucius Institute announces new leadership

 

Cindi chance
Dr. Cindi Chance, director of the Confucius Institute

Dr. Cindi Chance has been named director of the Georgia Regents University Confucius Institute. Chance previously served as the dean of the GRU College of Education for three years.

“I’m honored to represent this cultural centerpiece that brings GRU and the local Chinese community together,” Chance said. “Chinese heritage in the Augusta area is so rich, dating back to the late 1800s. I’m looking forward to continue honoring this heritage through the Confucius Institute and working side-by-side with the Chinese government to promote Chinese language and culture on our campus and in the CSRA.”

“In a world that is getting smaller and more interconnected, global awareness and cultural competency are essential skills to have,” GRU President Dr. Brooks Keel said. “The Confucius Institute is a great initiative that helps bring those skills to our students and to the Augusta area. We are confident that Dr. Chance will build upon the excellent work this institute has already done at our university and our community.”

Keel, who was named GRU president in July, also joins the Confucius Institute board.

Dr. Quincy Byrdsong, vice president for academic planning and strategic initiatives, will also oversee the institute’s academic programs and other initiatives. Byrdsong, who served as the associate vice president for health sciences strategic initiatives and engagement at Virginia Commonwealth University, joined GRU on Aug. 1.

Quincy Byrdsong_EdD_Associate Vice President for Health Sciences
Dr. Quincy Byrdsong, vice president for academic planning and strategic initiatives

“With China being such an important country politically and economically, studying the Chinese language and culture is of great benefit to our students and our community,” Byrdsong said. “I’m excited to help lead the Confucius Institute, enhancing multicultural awareness in our community as well as expanding GRU’s global presence.”

GRU is among 400 universities across the globe that has an institute that promotes the study of the Chinese language and culture. The GRU Confucius Institute, however, is the first to be affiliated with a comprehensive academic medical center and the first in the Western Hemisphere to focus on traditional Chinese medicine.

The nonprofit, public institute opened its doors on March 28, 2014, and is the result of a partnership between GRU and the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, one of the oldest and most notable universities in China for the study of TCM.

The unique partnership was announced in July 2013 with the authorization of the Office of Chinese Language Council International under the Ministry of Education of China.

Click here for coverage of Chinese artist LiHong Li’s donation of a landscape painting to the Confucius Institute.

Chinese artist donates painting to Confucius Institute

LiHong Li, an artist from Nanjing, China, gifted one of her landscape paintings to the GRU Confucius Institute at a luncheon on Aug. 20. The event also served as the first meeting of the new leadership of the institute with representatives of the local Chinese community.

GRU is among 400 universities across the globe that has an institute that promotes the study of the Chinese language and culture. The GRU Confucius Institute, however, is the first to be affiliated with a comprehensive academic medical center and the first in the Western Hemisphere to focus on traditional Chinese medicine.

The nonprofit, public institute opened March 28, 2014, and is the result of a partnership between GRU and the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, one of the oldest and most notable universities in China for the study of TCM.

Chinese physicians prepare to return home after three-month exchange of ideas

As part of the Confucius Institute’s mission for building bridges between Georgia Regents University and China, four Chinese physicians from Nanjing are finishing up a three-month visit, looking at the differences in health care between the two countries.

The four practice medicine at the Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, located in Nanjing, a city of roughly eight million people.

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Dr. Gang Xu, Dr. Xianhui Zhu, Dr. Jing Tao, Dr. Feng Guo

Not surprisingly, population is a factor in the differences they found.

“In China, we have a lot of patients,” said nephrologist Dr. Jing Tao. “And they don’t need to make an appointment to see the doctor, so if they have questions, they just go to the hospital to see the doctor.”

Cardiologist Dr. Xianhui Zhu agreed.

“In China, we don’t have family doctors, so the patients can choose the physicians by themselves,” she said. “They don’t need a referral. Patients in our hospital come to see the doctors at any time, but I have found at GRHealth, they have to schedule first unless they have an emergency case.”

To get a true feeling for American health care, the visiting physicians have shadowed their GRU counterparts.

“It’s been very nice,” Zhu said. “In the cardiology department, the physicians have an extraordinary agenda for me, so every day I can follow a different physician so I can learn a lot from them.”

Though the focus has been the exchange of medical information and practices, not all of the experiences have been medical. Last week, the four received a lecture about – and later instruction in – the game of golf from Kuan Kuo, a local golfer. Kuo, an onsite reporter for the Golf Channel who also owns Sho Chin Restaurant Group, was preparing to travel to Seattle to cover this week’s U.S. Open.

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Kuan Kuo explains golf at the Confucius Institute

None of the four had every golfed before, which isn’t surprising, given the prohibitive cost of the pastime in China.

“In China, it’s still considered a luxury activity and not really a sport,” Kuo said. “It’s very exclusive, and China is a communist country, so it really doesn’t like the classification of people.”

While it might be easier to dwell on such differences, Zhu said it’s equally important to recognize those things that both countries have in common.

“I’ve found the mission of our own hospital and GRHealth is the same, because we are both focused on patient-centered health and care,” she said.

And while the way they practice medicine might be different, the medicine itself is the same … sort of. Though traditional Chinese medicine is far from traditional here in the U.S., physician exchanges similar to this have aided in the dissemination of medical knowledge in all directions.

“I’ve found a lot of physicians have come to China to give a lecture and they are also curious about China and traditional Chinese medicine,” Zhu said. “I find most of them have a comprehensive attitude of medicine – not just Western medicine, but also medicine that comes from other countries, such as traditional Chinese medicine. So we talk about integrating medicine.”

That integration, she said, is a growing priority in China.

“Western medicine has rapidly developed, but we have a lot of clinical experiences in traditional Chinese medicine,” she said. “So how to express traditional Chinese medicine to the world and how to combine Eastern and Western medicine are the most popular topics for the researchers in China.”

Here, that integration led to some entertaining moments during their visit.

“At GRU, we have the Confucius Institute, and they gave the students some lessons about Chinese culture and traditional medicine, which we attended,” Tao said. “One of the classes was tai chi, which was very interesting, because the teacher was American.”

In the end, such things served to bring everyone closer together.

“I want to express our thanks to GRU and everyone here,” Zhu said. “This has been a memorable experience, and while we will be glad to return to our friends in China, we will miss our new friends at GRU.”

Chinese physicians exchange ideas

The Augusta Chronicle: April 28, 2015

Inside the simulation center at Georgia Regents University, interim Director Wendy Jo Wilkinson was struggling to get the birthing simulator to deliver a fetus when Dr. Xianhui Zhu made a wry observation.

ConfuciusSimLab.Sm“Maybe it’s not her time,” the Chinese cardiologist joked.

Zhu is among a handful of physicians from Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medi­cine who are spending three months at GRU as part of an exchange being facilitated by GRU’s Confucius Institute.

While there are a number of such institutes in Georgia and worldwide fostering educational exchanges, GRU’s is the only one between an academic medical center and Chinese institutions that focus on traditional Chinese medicine.

Read: Chinese physicians exchange ideas at GRU

Notarization day at Confucius Institute

The Georgia Regents University Confucius Institute hosted a notarization day Saturday for members of Augusta’s Chinese community. Officials from the Consulate-General of the People’s Republic of China authenticated documents, such as marriage licenses and birth records, in order to facilitate document exchanges across countries.

The GRU Confucius Institute opened in March. The nonprofit center offers classes and community outreach in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese language, and culture. Learn more at gru.edu/centers/confucius.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/georgiaregentsu/sets/72157647893355466

Free martial arts performances for Confucius Institute Day

Augusta, Ga. Two free martial arts and dance performances will be offered to the community in celebration of Confucius Institute Day, a global celebration of Confucius Institutes including the Georgia Regents University institute, which opened in March.

Elite students from Beijing’s Capital University will perform:

Martial Arts Demo

11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27

Augusta Mall by Macy’s

 

Chinese Dream Kung Fu Show

2014 Confucius Institute Martial Arts Tour

6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27

Kroc Center Chapel

“The Confucius Institute exists to open a window to China, with opportunities for faculty, students, and the community to learn from one another,” said Dr. Joe Tsien, founding director of the GRU Confucius Institute, a nonprofit public institute dedicated to the study of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese language, and culture. “These performances give Augustans an opportunity to explore art and culture direct from China. Confucius Institute Day offers an immersion into beautiful, historical arts like wushu, kung fu, and tai chi.”

The afternoon demo at the Augusta Mall includes language lessons, Chinese calligraphy demonstrations, and information about acupuncture. The evening performance at the Kroc Center features 10 martial arts and dance performances, including an interactive martial arts demonstration.

GRU is one of more than 400 universities worldwide to host institutes for the study of Chinese language and culture. GRU, however, is the first in the Western Hemisphere with a focus on Traditional Chinese Medicine, and the first in the world to be affiliated with a comprehensive academic health center. The GRU Confucius Institute was created in partnership with the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, one of the oldest and most notable universities in China for the study of TCM. This fall, GRU began offering introductory courses in TCM and Chinese culture. Learn more at gru.edu/centers/Confucius.

 

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The  nonprofit public institute for the study of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese language, and culture was created in partnership with the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, one of the oldest and most notable universities in China for the study of TCM. When it opened in March, the GRU Confucius Institute was the first in the world to be affiliated with a comprehensive academic health center.

Learn more about the institute and its events at gru.edu/centers/confucius.

5 don’t-miss arts events at GRU

1) GRU Idol searches for top singer

The Jaguar Production Crew presents “GRU Idol,” a showcase of the university’s best singing talent, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, in the Maxwell Theatre. The musical group Colour of London will host and perform. Free for GRU students. Guests are $5.

 2) Free movie screening with the GRU Cinema Series

The GRU Cinema Series returns Thursday with “Ida,” a moving and intimate drama from acclaimed director Pawel Pawlikowski about a young nun in 1960s Poland who makes a shocking discovery on the verge of taking her vows. It screens at 1 and 7 p.m. Sept. 18 in the Maxwell Theatre on the Summerville Campus. For more information on Cinema Series events, visit facebook.com/CinemaSeriesGRU.

3) ‘Voice off’ by Judith Barry opens at Byrd Gallery

“Voice off,” a unique video installation by artist Judith Barry, opens Sept. 22 at the Mary S. Byrd Gallery of Art. The gallery is free, open to the public, and located in Washington Hall on the Summerville Campus. An artist talk with Barry is scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, in University Hall, room 170. A reception will follow in the gallery at 6 p.m. Learn more at gru.edu/byrd.

4) Confucius Institute hosts free martial arts, dance performances

Celebrate Confucius Institute Day with free martial arts and dance performance by elite performers from Beijing’s Capital University. A demo, including language lessons and acupuncture demonstrations, begins at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, outside Macy’s at the Augusta Mall. A full-scale evening performance begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Kroc Center Chapel. The Confucius Institute is a new center offering courses in Chinese language, culture, and Traditional Chinese Medicine at GRU. Learn more at gru.edu/centers/Confucius.

5) Vocal chorus performs ‘How the West Was Sung’

The Garden City Chorus has invited the Atlanta Vocal Project Chorus for a special fall performance sponsored by the GRU Department of Music at 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, in the Maxwell Theatre. Students are $12. General public tickets are $15. See augusta.universitytickets.com for more information.

 

Confucius Institute announces fall classes

AUGUSTA, Ga. The Georgia Regents University Confucius Institute, a new center for the study of Chinese language, culture, and Traditional Chinese Medicine, has announced new courses for fall 2014.

The GRU Confucius Institute opened in March in partnership with Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, one of the oldest and most notable universities in China for the study of TCM. These are the first classes to be offered to GRU students through the new non-profit public institute.

New classes include:

Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (HUMN 2950/4950 C or CHNS 2950): This course will enable students to comprehend essential Chinese language material about daily life and communicate in basic and simple Chinese. It will introduce students to significant aspects of Chinese culture.

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (CTCM 4000 and CTCM 7000): These undergraduate and graduate courses introduce students to TCM and related topics, including the theory of Yin-Yang and Five Elements, theory of Qui, techniques of acupuncture, and Chinese herbs.

The language and culture course is likely just the first of several offerings at GRU,  said Dr. Robert Bledsoe, Director of Humanities. Additional Chinese language courses may be offered for the 2015-16 academic year.

“We hope that students will take advantage of this opportunity.  The course on our Summerville Campus is designed as an introduction to Chinese Language and Culture,” he said. “Students should be able to have brief conversations in Chinese on essential topics such as introductions, ordering food, understanding directions.  They will also be introduced to Chinese culture through traditions, such as the traditional Chinese tea ceremony, celebrations, and Chinese calligraphy.”

Class offerings on the Health Sciences campus will focus on TCM. When it opened in the spring, GRU’s Confucius Institute became the first in the world to be affiliated with a comprehensive academic health center and the first in the Western Hemisphere with a focus on TCM.

“Traditional Chinese Medicine is one of the most famous traditional medicines in the world,” said Dr. Lester Pretlow, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in The College of Allied Health Sciences. “Its history, special theories, and effective treatment methods, such as acupuncture, will be introduced in these courses to raise awareness of the merits and benefits of TCM.”

The new additions give GRU students the knowledge they need to compete in a global job market, according to Dr. Joe Tsien, Founding Director of the institute.

“Every time we expand our academic programs, we are offering more opportunities for our students to learn and enrich themselves,” Tsien said. “This is an age of globalization, and we want our children to be aware of the many other opportunities they may have. The Confucius Institute sets us on a world stage, opening a window to China.”

The courses were developed by the Department of English and Foreign Languages in the Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences and The College of Allied Health Sciences. They are open to all students. Faculty and staff may audit courses. For more information on adding a course, see gru.edu/registrar. For more information on the Confucius Institute, see gru.edu/centers/confucius/.