Category Archives: GRHealth

GRHealth news and information

GRHealth offers Saturday mammograms

[Click here to read this story on Jagwire.]

AUGUSTA, Ga.- Finding the time for a mammogram can be challenging for busy women. However, a weekend mammogram might be your answer. October is national Breast Cancer Awareness Month and the Breast Health Center at Georgia Regents Medical Center is offering patients a chance to schedule a mammogram for any Saturday in October between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. by calling 706-721-9729 (XRAY).

 

The Breast Health Center at Georgia Regents is an American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Center of Excellence and the only center in the area using 3-D mammography, also known as tomosynthesis, which has been shown to improve cancer detection and reduce false-positive results. In addition, the Center, which performs more than 6,000 mammograms each year, was recognized by Health Imaging magazine in 2013 with a Patient-centric Imaging Award.

 

Recently, the American College of Surgeons also granted a three-year full accreditation to the Breast Health Center through its National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers for quality care. To earn NAPBC accreditation, a center must demonstrate proficiency in leadership, clinical management, research, community outreach, professional education and quality improvement.  In essence, this represents a firm commitment to offer patients every significant advantage in their battle against breast disease.

 

Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death among women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Statistics show that one in eight women will develop breast cancer sometime in her lifetime. If detected early, the five-year survival rate is 97 percent. The American Cancer Society recommends an annual mammogram paired with a clinical breast exam for women 40 and older.

Breast Health Center is located on the first floor of the Medical Center at 1120 15th St. To schedule an appointment, call 706-721-9729 or visit visit www.grhealth.org/breasthealth.

5 sleep tips for school-aged children

[Click here to read this story on Jagwire.]

Everyone needs to sleep. A good night’s sleep boosts health, safety, performance and wellbeing, and it’s especially important for school-age children.

“Children and teens need significantly more sleep than adults to support their rapid mental and physical development,” said Dr. Clay Stallworth, a pediatrician for GRHealth at the West Wheeler office. “A child’s body and brain are busy during slumber preparing for another day of tasks and growth, so it’s essential that children get the proper amount of sleep.”

It’s not always easy to know when kids need more sleep because drowsy children don’t necessarily slow down the way adults do—they wind up.

So, just how many ZZZ’s are enough for your school-age child?

“Every child is unique and has unique sleep needs; however there are suggestions based on age,” Stallworth said. “The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends 10 to 11 hours of sleep for school-age children.”

Stallworth also shares five tips for helping your children achieve a good night’s sleep:

1. Develop a regular daily bedtime schedule, and don’t stray from it – even on weekends. Your child’s body gets used to an established rejuvenation time and will be ready for sleep.

2. Create a standard and enjoyable bedtime routine. Set aside 15 to 30 minutes to get your child ready to go to sleep each night. Children like a sense of predictability in their routine because it brings them comfort. A suggested routine, especially for children 10 and under, would include taking a bath, dressing for bed, brushing teeth, reading a story and saying goodnight.

3. Avoid before-bedtime sleep traps. Do not let your child eat chocolate or sugary foods, or drink caffeinated beverages late in the day. It’s also important to establish an early curfew – 30 minutes or more before bedtime – on TV watching, video games and even vigorous play, so that children are not over-stimulated close to bedtime.

4. Establish a permanent “sleep-friendly” environment. Make sure your child’s bedroom is quiet, dark and at a comfortable temperature. Keep the bedtime environment the same all night.

5. Encourage your child to fall asleep independently. Whether an infant, toddler or older child, this is a must. Stallworth recommends accomplishing this in your child’s infancy. The older children get, the harder it will be to break their dependence on Mom or Dad for help with falling asleep, and that can affect Mom and Dad’s bedtime.

Studies show that about one in three children – kindergarten through fourth grade – may experience a sleep-related problem, such as frequent waking, sleep walking, talking in their sleep, bedwetting or nightmares. Fortunately, as they mature, children usually outgrow these common sleep issues.

“With a solid routine and a little discipline, you can help your children achieve sweet dreams,” Stallworth said. “And chances are, if your kids are getting a good night’s sleep, you probably will too, and that makes for a healthier family all around.”

The doctor is on: Your Health with Dr. Leonard Reeves

[Click here to read this story on Jagwire.]

There’s no doubting that Dr. Leonard Reeves, associate dean of GRU’s North West Clinical Campus, is a busy man.

In addition to his role as associate dean, he also serves as a Family Medicine Doctor in Rome, balancing his time between seeing patients at Floyd Medical Center and at Redmond Regional Medical Center. He is also involved in the Rome community as a member of the Rome Rotary and currently sits on the executive committee and the Board of the Greater Rome Area Chamber of Commerce.

But Reeves has another passion outside of his love for medicine, education and community service. In his spare time, Reeves also produces a series of YouTube videos explaining complex healthcare topics in the simplest terms.

To view Reeves’ latest video, titled “Your Health – Sleepiness & Diabetes,” click here.

 

DCH affirms Columbia County hospital decision

The following email was sent on Sunday, September 27, to members of the GRU and GRHealth community by Shawn Vincent, vice president of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Dear Colleagues,

We have some exciting news to share with you regarding our Columbia County hospital project.

Today we learned that the Georgia Department of Community Health affirmed its decision to grant Georgia Regents Medical Center a Certificate of Need to build a 100-bed hospital in Columbia County.

As you may remember, after the Department’s November 2014 decision to issue the CON to Georgia Regents, both University and Doctors hospitals filed appeals with DCH contesting the decision. This DCH decision answers those appeals.

We applaud the team at DCH for the time, care and effort that they’ve invested in evaluating the health care needs of Columbia County’s citizens and in choosing the most appropriate provider to meet those needs.

We are confident that our proposal is the most comprehensive and forward-thinking, and that by leveraging equipment and IT solutions that our health care partners Philips and Cerner have not yet made widely available, Columbia County could soon lay claim to the most technologically advanced hospital in the nation.

If there is no further opposition to the Certificate of Need, we will work to finalize the purchase of the building site in Grovetown so that we can begin construction.

We are committed to building a community teaching hospital and health care campus that will contribute to the economic, social, cultural and physical health and wellness of the residents of Columbia County and its neighbors.

We appreciate all of you for supporting our efforts, and we remain confident that we will soon move this project forward.

Kindest regards,

Shawn P. Vincent, Sr.
Vice President of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Beat the Bug: Get your flu shot early

FluShotNo matter how the years come and go, flu season always seems to sneak up on us. This year, get the jump on the bug by getting your flu shot as early as possible. You (and your co-workers and classmates) will be glad you did.

To view a listing of flu shot clinics, see the schedule below:

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 14 Sept. 15 Sept. 16 Sept. 17 Sept. 18
Open Flu season

 

 

Satellite Clinic

8:00am to 11:00am

 

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 21 Sept. 22 Sept. 23 Sept. 24 Sept. 25
Georgia War Veteran’s Nursing Home

7 a.m.-
10 a.m.

Pharm. D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 28 Sept. 29 Sept. 30 Oct. 1 Oct. 2
Georgia War Veteran’s Nursing Home

7 a.m. – 10a.m.

Pharm. D

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm. D

Annex

GRMA Benefits fair

8 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm. D

Kick Off -Cafeteria

Terrace Dining

9 a.m. –
2 p.m.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 5 Oct. 6 Oct. 7 Oct. 8 Oct. 9
Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 12 Oct.13 Oct. 14 Oct. 15 Oct. 16
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 19 Oct. 20 Oct. 21 Oct. 22 Oct. 23
Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 26 Oct. 27 Oct. 28 Oct. 29 Oct. 30
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 2 Nov. 3 Nov. 4 Nov. 5 Nov. 6
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 9 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 Nov. 12 Nov. 13
 

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 16 Nov. 17 Nov. 18 Nov. 19 Nov. 20
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Many outpatient surgeries will move to Evans

Georgia Regents Medical Center invests in outpatient surgery center with University Health Care System

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Georgia Regents Medical Center has purchased a 30-percent ownership in the Surgery Center of Columbia County. This 21,000-square-foot outpatient day surgery facility in Evans opened in 2007 as a joint venture between University Health Resources, Inc., the for-profit corporation of University Health Care System, and more than a dozen board-certified physicians and podiatrists.

“We are pleased to be able to partner with Georgia Regents Medical Center in an effort to help them increase their outpatient surgery capacity and better serve their patients in need of surgery,” explained James Davis, President/CEO of University Health Care System. “It makes sense for both parties to maximize the use of existing facilities.”

LogosUH.GRMCRecent advancements in technology, particularly in minimally invasive surgery, have increased the demand for outpatient surgical care, because it can benefit patients through shorter operations, fewer complications and quicker recoveries, according to industry reports.

Located on University’s longstanding Evans Campus on North Belair Road, the Joint Commission-accredited Surgery Center of Columbia County offers a broad array of outpatient procedures performed by highly skilled and compassionate physicians and staff in four spacious surgical suites using state-of-the-art technology. Some of the surgical services offered at the center include general, colorectal, ENT, and GI surgeries.

“We’re excited about this new collaboration with University Hospital,” said Dr. Charles G. Howell, Chairman of the Department of Surgery at Georgia Regents Medical Center and Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics at Georgia Regents University’s Medical College of Georgia. “We have highly qualified surgeons performing some very complex and lengthy operations in our hospital operating rooms, and that doesn’t always mix well with ambulatory surgical care. Moving more outpatient surgeries to Columbia County will help us alleviate some of the space concerns we’re experiencing so that we can meet the needs of our patients and families more quickly and efficiently at both locations. Additionally, this partnership is another great opportunity for us to work with University Hospital to make Augusta a medical destination.”

About University
University Health Care System is anchored by the 581-bed, not-for-profit University Hospital, founded in 1818. The main campus has expanded to include the Heart & Vascular Institute, an Outpatient Center and office buildings that house more than 600 private practice and employed physicians, and various treatment centers. University has the largest primary care and prompt care network in the region and also includes University Hospital McDuffie in Thomson, Ga., as well as numerous medical campuses in two states, Brandon Wilde Continuing Care Retirement Community and two extended care facilities. University is the only hospital in the region to have earned Magnet designation for nursing excellence, and has been named the National Research Corporation Consumer Choice Award winner for overall quality and image every year since 1999.

About GRMC
Georgia Regents Medical Center is a not-for-profit providing clinical operations as a cooperative organization for Georgia Regents University. The 478-bed Medical Center includes a Critical Care Center, housing the region’s only Level I trauma center ; the 154-bed Children’s Hospital of Georgia, providing the highest level of pediatric critical care and neonatal intensive care; and more than 80 outpatient clinics that provide primary and specialty care throughout the state. Georgia Regents physicians are consistently ranked among the nation’s best in both America’s Top Doctors® and Best Doctors in America.® Additionally, Children’s Hospital of Georgia was recently ranked as the nation’s highest performing children’s hospital in quality and safety by the University HealthSystem Consortium.

Augusta University: FAQs

[Click here to view this story on Jagwire.]

To help ease the transition from Georgia Regents University to Augusta University, a site has been created at au.gru.edu that will serve as a landing page for all communications regarding the changeover.

Please frequent this site often to make sure you have the latest information about this process.

Here is a list of the most recently added FAQs:

Why was this name chosen?

Augusta University has always been a much-loved name choice for our institution, and selecting it is recognition of the critical partnership that exists between our institution and our local community. The energy and enthusiasm generated by this partnership will be instrumental as we build our reputation as a national leader in teaching, research, health care and service.

When does the name take effect?

When the Board of Regents said the change is “effective immediately,” they authorized us to immediately begin working on an implementation plan. After thoughtful discussion and careful planning to ensure a smooth transition, an official date will be announced that will likely be some months from now.

What do we call ourselves in the meantime?

We will be GRU until the effective date of the name change. In some areas, external rules direct our actions, but in other areas, we can begin to gradually transition to the new name, and we will communicate these decisions on the website au.gru.edu, which we encourage you to check often.

How does this impact our reputation nationally?

Dr. Keel and his administration understand that the enhancement of our reputation is a critical issue, and that questions and confusion, particularly from individuals outside Augusta, will need to be addressed. Whether we are called GRU or Augusta University, it is the stories about the great students we attract, the discoveries our researchers make, the exceptional teaching of our faculty, the compassionate healing done by our health care professionals and the service we provide to this great community that are at the heart of our story.

What do we do about logos and email signatures?

While we appreciate the enthusiasm so many have exhibited about the change to Augusta University, we would ask that individuals not create their own logos or signatures in the interim period. For the time being, please use “Georgia Regents University, soon to be Augusta University” in your email signatures and similar applications and use current GRU and GRHealth logos when needed until provided new ones.

Will we have the option of having dual diplomas?

That is one of the questions leaders will address. With previous name changes, students have been given the option to select a commemorative diploma in addition to their actual diploma. We expect to be able to do the same with this name change.

 

A dietitian’s perspective: The struggle with malnutrition

Malnutrition Awareness Week takes place from Sept. 28 to Oct. 2.

In response, the following article was contributed by Carly Moss, an inpatient clinical dietitian at GRHealth:

For the past few decades, evidence of America’s battle against obesity has been everywhere. It has galvanized health care professionals and researchers into action, instigated new government programs and served as a hot topic in the media. But more recently, another battle that is just as crucial to the health and wellbeing of millions of Americans has started to gain attention.

Malnutrition is a foreign concept to many – something almost unheard of in this country in this day and age – but in reality, it is a burden within our very own communities. Every day malnutrition impairs quality of life, increases health care costs and hinders patient recovery from illness and injury. The belief that malnutrition is a non-issue in our country is just one of the many myths surrounding this topic. Here are some other misconceptions to consider:

Myth: All Americans have access to a good food supply.

Simply put, malnutrition is imbalanced nutrition, whether it’s an imbalance in protein and caloric intake or in vitamin and mineral intake. Unfortunately, many Americans live in environments that are conducive to imbalanced nutrition. According to a 2011 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Richmond County alone has six food deserts, defined as areas that lack access to affordable, healthy foods. People living in such areas may struggle with maintaining balanced nutrition, which can ultimately lead to nutrient deficiencies and even malnutrition. Although poor food accessibility is a risk factor for malnutrition, it is actually not the primary one. This leads to another common misconception about malnutrition.

Myth: Food insecurity is the main culprit in malnutrition.

This may be true in parts of the world where food insecurity is widespread rather than isolated in food deserts. In the United States, however, injury and illness are the major contributors to malnutrition. Those of us who work in a hospital setting know that malnutrition is prevalent among those struggling with various chronic illnesses, including cancer, liver cirrhosis, kidney disease and severe gastrointestinal disorders to name just a few. Malnutrition is also not uncommon among patients with major trauma and injury. In fact, studies have shown anywhere from 20-50 percent of hospitalized patients are malnourished. The development of malnutrition is often multifactorial. These patients have increased protein and caloric needs due to chronic inflammation, wounds, malabsorption and hypermetabolism. At the same time, food intake tends to be poor due to food intolerances, inability to prepare foods or feed oneself, chewing and swallowing difficulty, depression or a combination of these factors. Over an extended period of time, these factors can ultimately result in malnutrition.

Myth: Malnutrition is easy to recognize.

Many people visualize malnutrition as wasting and atrophy to the point of a skeletal appearance, but malnutrition is rarely so obvious or dramatic. In fact, malnutrition can occur in people who are normal weight and overweight as well as those who are underweight. Diagnosing malnutrition requires physical examination to look for muscle and fat loss in certain areas of the body as well as a thorough assessment of body weight history, nutrient intake, gastrointestinal symptoms and functional capabilities. There is no foolproof lab test that acts as a marker for malnutrition, making the condition even harder to recognize.

Myth: Malnutrition is easy to treat.

Recommending increased food intake is rarely sufficient for treating malnutrition. As mentioned previously, most malnourished individuals already face many obstacles to meeting their nutrient needs. The challenge may be even greater if the malnourished individual lives in a food desert with poor access to healthy foods. It takes a multidisciplinary team to develop a nutrition plan appropriate for a malnourished patient, execute the plan and monitor progress. Some malnourished patients may require artificial nutrition support, which can be given through feeding tubes or as an intravenous infusion. In other cases, a malnourished individual may need to change the types of foods they are eating rather than the amount. There is hardly ever a simple, one-time solution for malnutrition. Just as malnutrition takes time to develop, it also takes time and effort to resolve.

Good nutrition is a vital aspect of recovery and healing, but it can also be very difficult to maintain for those dealing with illness and injury. This presents a challenge for these individuals as well as the family members and health care professionals caring for them. The first step to addressing the challenge is awareness of malnutrition and its risk factors and recognizing its presence within our own community.

Malnutrition is a burden to those who struggle with it, but the good news is that with the right plan of care, it can be managed and even reversed. In many cases, food and nutrition can truly act as medicine by improving quality of life, restoring strength and functional capabilities and aiding healing and recovery. The challenge is real, but in Augusta and across the country our health care professionals are equipped better than ever to help patients and their families meet it.

#

Carly Moss is an inpatient clinical dietitian at GRHealth where she works with a variety of patient populations. Her interests include nutrition support therapy, nutrition in critical illness, and education. She was recently voted Preceptor of the Year for the Augusta Area Dietetic Internship.

Tea time for female veterans

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Retired Colonel Judy Mosbey served her country faithfully during World War II. This week, the staff at Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home served her.

What was on the menu? Hot tea, finger sandwiches and cake.

“No men are allowed,” said Georgia War’s Activities Coordinator Kimberly Thomas. “This is one event that we do exclusively for our female veterans to thank them for all they’ve done for us.”

That meant Associate Director Carlton Deese wasn’t supposed to be there, but he only stopped by for a couple of minutes to chat with the residents and take a little friendly ribbing from one of the ladies.

Deese said there are approximately 154 veterans currently living at the nursing home; however, only about a dozen of them are women. That’s why singling them out with special events like the Ladies’ Tea is so important.

IMG_2681
Judy Mosbey, stirring her tea, was a flight instructor in the Air Force.

Mosbey wore a lavender hat and scarf for the occasion. The former flight instructor served in the Air Force for nearly 30 years, alongside her husband, who was also a pilot. Seventy-five-year-old Mosbey said that back when she enlisted, she realized that she should learn to fly, too, so that she could keep up with him.

The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program was created in August 1943, because of a shortage of male pilots in World War II, according to the Women of World War II website. These female civilian pilots served under military command and flew planes within the U.S., to free up male combat pilots for overseas duty. They had the privileges of officers, but were never formally adopted into the Army Air Force. However, in November 1977, President Carter signed a bill granting WWII veterans’ status for former WASPs.

IMG_2684
Vera Molini said she served in the Navy.

Sipping tea at the table on Mosbey’s left and draped in a yellow floral scarf was Vera Molini, 93, who served in the Navy. The WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) program was created in August 1942 in response to the need for additional military personnel during World War II. From the very beginning, the WAVES were an official part of the Navy, and its members held the same rank and ratings as male personnel.

IMG_2676
Activities Director Kimberly Thomas pours hot water in Pauline Walker’s tea cup.

Pauline Walker, 82, was clothed in shades of red, which included a garnet-colored carnation headband and a crimson shirt and scarf. Walker served as a secretary in the Army during the war.

Perhaps the most articulate of the ladies at the tea party was Ruby Kleinrath, 93. Army Nurse Corps veterans like Kleinrath worked close to the front lines in WW II, serving in field hospitals and evacuation hospitals, on hospital trains and ships, and as flight nurses on medical transport planes. The skill and dedication of these nurses contributed to lower post-injury mortality rates among American military forces in every theater of the war, according to the website.

IMG_2677
Ruby Kleinrath, 93, waits for her tea to be stirred.

In all, nine veterans were gathered around the table in the first-floor cafeteria for the Ladies’ Tea on Sept. 23. Organizers piped in music from the 1940s and ’50s through a CD player to create a more nostalgic event. They also helped each resident create fall decorations for their doors, by attaching autumn leaves and miniature scarecrows to grapevine wreaths.

The Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home, or what many refer to fondly as the “Blue Goose,” is a 192-bed skilled nursing facility owned by the Georgia Department of Veterans Service and operated by Georgia Regents University. Throughout its 45-year history of serving the veteran community, Georgia War Veterans Nursing Home has placed a strong emphasis on ensuring that the individual needs of every veteran patient are met.

The home was recently ranked in the nation’s top 15 percent of senior health care providers for patient satisfaction by Pinnacle Quality Insight.

GRU faculty and staff give big for IGRU

It’s safe to say GRU faculty and staff have more than risen to the challenge set forth by last year’s IGRU campaign.

So far, we have surpassed our goal of $325,000 by raising a total of $326,519.09 – a 24 percent increase in giving from this time last year.

On Friday, Sept. 11 faculty and staff celebrated that success with a sweet treat from Kona Ice. The Community portion of the campaign kicked off on Thursday, Sept. 17 with a luncheon at the Augusta Country Club and will continue through Oct. 9.

Still want to give? There are plenty of ways left to contribute. From now until the end of the IGRU campaign, you  can still make a gift at giving.gru.edu/IGRU.

You can also give by joining us at one of the following events:

GRUB for GRU  – Thursday, Sept. 24
IGRU Alumni BBQ & Celebration – Friday, Oct. 9
Jaguar Jaunt 5K – Saturday, Oct. 10

In the meantime, if you’re thinking about giving, enjoy this special message from President Brooks Keel.