All posts by LaTina Emerson

GRU establishes Confucius Institute with Shanghai University

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Georgia Regents University has been awarded a Confucius Institute, in partnership with Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, by the Han Ban in Beijing, China.

GRU Confucius Institute
GRU Confucius Institute

The mission of the GRU Confucius Institute is twofold, first to offer Chinese language, culture and arts to the university and community. The Chinese community has a long and storied history in Augusta with its first Chinese immigrants digging the Augusta Canal in the late 1870’s. Bringing this type of cultural benefit adds to this Augusta heritage. Secondly, because the GRU Confucius Institute is distinctive in this hemisphere of the world by offering studies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it will promote learning and knowledge for practitioners, as well as deeper cultural understanding and patient centered benefits of Chinese Traditional Medicine in Health Professions therapies at local, regional, and national levels, said GRU Vice Provost Roman Cibirka.

“This is an exciting time for Georgia Regents University,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “It is an honor to be selected as a Confucius Institute partner. While we have a history of strong relationships with Chinese institutions through our research investigators, we have never formalized them to the degree we are today. We are establishing the Confucius Institute to develop more formal ties and a closer working relationship with universities in China. The institute will also provide a tremendous cultural benefit to the local Chinese community, many of whom are students, faculty and staff on the GRU campus, and expose the entire Augusta area to the rich Chinese heritage.”

“The Confucius Institute is aligned with the Board of Regents’ strategic plan to globalize education and Georgia Regents University’s strategic plan,” Cibirka said. “It will be an integral part of the university’s globalization efforts. The institute will continue GRU’s footpath to achieve several organizational goals, such as becoming an internationally recognized leader in education, research, discovery, and scholarship by capitalizing on global partnerships.  These partnerships can enhance strategic areas of academic enrichment, research growth in biomedicine and the health services, as well as provide crucial wellness service to the local and global communities.”

Shanghai University of TCM, founded in 1956, is one of the first four colleges and universities of TCM established after the People’s Republic of China was founded. The university is located in the Scientific Research and Education Zone, ZhangJiang High-tech Park, Pudong New Area. It has 7,448 students, including over 1,000 short-term students from over 30 countries such as Japan, Korea, Russia, France, England, America, Germany and Italy who study at the university each year, and more than 600 specialists and professors.

The GRU Confucius Institute is premised on creating a highly visible and sustainable Confucius Institute with three distinct goals: 1) establish a comprehensive academic center for advancing the study of Chinese language and culture, 2) enhance multicultural awareness through a Chinese language and cultures program aimed at youth through adults in the broad Augusta community, and 3) provide Chinese language and culture instruction targeted to health professionals. These goals will showcase the GRU Confucius Institute as an international, one-of a kind resource center linked with an academic health center.  The SUTCM-GRU partnership will also develop a museum showcasing TCM exhibits.  A GRU Confucius Institute grand opening will be in approximately six months.

Dr. Joe Tsien, Co-Director of the Brain and Behavior Discovery Institute at Medical College of Georgia and MCG Professor of Neurology, will serve as the founding Director of the GRU Confucius Institute.

“The successful application and in a record time is a clear testimony to the visionary leadership and enormous strength of this great university and our Chinese partnership university,” Tsien said. “With close to almost 400 Confucius Institutes established to date world-wide, we are very proud that GRU receives this high distinction to be the very first Confucius Institute in North and South America to have the specialty education and training in Traditional Chinese Medicine.  This fits so well with the University’s roles in seeking excellence in education and research, including in the emerging area of alternative medicine.”

GRU will receive matching funds from the Confucius Headquarter, known as Han Ban, from Beijing of the People’s Republic of China.

Gary Tom, President of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, echoes the views of Dr. Ray Rufo, Past President of the CCBA, about the local benefits of the new GRU Confucius Institute.

“On behalf of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, we would like to extend our congratulations and appreciation to Dr. Azziz and his leadership team in pursuing and obtaining a Confucius Institute designation for GRU,” Tom said. “Augusta’s Chinese community has always taken pride in being an active member of our community, sharing our culture and maintaining our traditions.  We are ecstatic that the Confucius Institute will be available to provide more robust and diverse resources to the community.  We are excited about what the Confucius Institute means for GRU and its academic programs. We are equally excited about the opportunities and benefits that the Confucius Institute will bring to our educational, business, and cultural community, and we are extremely excited in what this means for our own children in the Chinese community to help them better learn about their rich heritage.”

GRU establishes Confucius Institute with Shanghai University

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Georgia Regents University has been awarded a Confucius Institute, in partnership with Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, by the Han Ban in Beijing, China.

GRU Confucius Institute
GRU Confucius Institute

The mission of the GRU Confucius Institute is twofold, first to offer Chinese language, culture and arts to the university and community. The Chinese community has a long and storied history in Augusta with its first Chinese immigrants digging the Augusta Canal in the late 1870’s. Bringing this type of cultural benefit adds to this Augusta heritage. Secondly, because the GRU Confucius Institute is distinctive in this hemisphere of the world by offering studies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it will promote learning and knowledge for practitioners, as well as deeper cultural understanding and patient centered benefits of Chinese Traditional Medicine in Health Professions therapies at local, regional, and national levels, said GRU Vice Provost Roman Cibirka.

“This is an exciting time for Georgia Regents University,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “It is an honor to be selected as a Confucius Institute partner. While we have a history of strong relationships with Chinese institutions through our research investigators, we have never formalized them to the degree we are today. We are establishing the Confucius Institute to develop more formal ties and a closer working relationship with universities in China. The institute will also provide a tremendous cultural benefit to the local Chinese community, many of whom are students, faculty and staff on the GRU campus, and expose the entire Augusta area to the rich Chinese heritage.”

“The Confucius Institute is aligned with the Board of Regents’ strategic plan to globalize education and Georgia Regents University’s strategic plan,” Cibirka said. “It will be an integral part of the university’s globalization efforts. The institute will continue GRU’s footpath to achieve several organizational goals, such as becoming an internationally recognized leader in education, research, discovery, and scholarship by capitalizing on global partnerships.  These partnerships can enhance strategic areas of academic enrichment, research growth in biomedicine and the health services, as well as provide crucial wellness service to the local and global communities.”

Shanghai University of TCM, founded in 1956, is one of the first four colleges and universities of TCM established after the People’s Republic of China was founded. The university is located in the Scientific Research and Education Zone, ZhangJiang High-tech Park, Pudong New Area. It has 7,448 students, including over 1,000 short-term students from over 30 countries such as Japan, Korea, Russia, France, England, America, Germany and Italy who study at the university each year, and more than 600 specialists and professors.

The GRU Confucius Institute is premised on creating a highly visible and sustainable Confucius Institute with three distinct goals: 1) establish a comprehensive academic center for advancing the study of Chinese language and culture, 2) enhance multicultural awareness through a Chinese language and cultures program aimed at youth through adults in the broad Augusta community, and 3) provide Chinese language and culture instruction targeted to health professionals. These goals will showcase the GRU Confucius Institute as an international, one-of a kind resource center linked with an academic health center.  The SUTCM-GRU partnership will also develop a museum showcasing TCM exhibits.  A GRU Confucius Institute grand opening will be in approximately six months.

Dr. Joe Tsien, Co-Director of the Brain and Behavior Discovery Institute at Medical College of Georgia and MCG Professor of Neurology, will serve as the founding Director of the GRU Confucius Institute.

“The successful application and in a record time is a clear testimony to the visionary leadership and enormous strength of this great university and our Chinese partnership university,” Tsien said. “With close to almost 400 Confucius Institutes established to date world-wide, we are very proud that GRU receives this high distinction to be the very first Confucius Institute in North and South America to have the specialty education and training in Traditional Chinese Medicine.  This fits so well with the University’s roles in seeking excellence in education and research, including in the emerging area of alternative medicine.”

GRU will receive matching funds from the Confucius Headquarter, known as Han Ban, from Beijing of the People’s Republic of China.

Gary Tom, President of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, echoes the views of Dr. Ray Rufo, Past President of the CCBA, about the local benefits of the new GRU Confucius Institute.

“On behalf of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, we would like to extend our congratulations and appreciation to Dr. Azziz and his leadership team in pursuing and obtaining a Confucius Institute designation for GRU,” Tom said. “Augusta’s Chinese community has always taken pride in being an active member of our community, sharing our culture and maintaining our traditions.  We are ecstatic that the Confucius Institute will be available to provide more robust and diverse resources to the community.  We are excited about what the Confucius Institute means for GRU and its academic programs. We are equally excited about the opportunities and benefits that the Confucius Institute will bring to our educational, business, and cultural community, and we are extremely excited in what this means for our own children in the Chinese community to help them better learn about their rich heritage.”

GRU establishes Confucius Institute with Shanghai University

Georgia Regents University has been awarded a Confucius Institute, in partnership with Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, by the Hanban in Beijing, China.

The mission of the GRU Confucius Institute is twofold, first to offer Chinese language, culture and arts to the university and community. The Chinese community has a long and storied history in Augusta with its first Chinese immigrants digging the Augusta Canal in the late 1870’s. Bringing this type of cultural benefit adds to this Augusta heritage. Secondly, because the GRU Confucius Institute is distinctive in this hemisphere of the world by offering studies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it will promote learning and knowledge for practitioners, as well as deeper cultural understanding and patient centered benefits of Chinese Traditional Medicine in Health Professions therapies at local, regional, and national levels, said GRU Vice Provost Roman Cibirka.

“This is an exciting time for Georgia Regents University,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “It is an honor to be selected as a Confucius Institute partner. While we have a history of strong relationships with Chinese institutions through our research investigators, we have never formalized them to the degree we are today. We are establishing the Confucius Institute to develop more formal ties and a closer working relationship with universities in China. The institute will also provide a tremendous cultural benefit to the local Chinese community, many of whom are students, faculty and staff on the GRU campus, and expose the entire Augusta area to the rich Chinese heritage.”

“The Confucius Institute is aligned with the Board of Regents’ strategic plan to globalize education and Georgia Regents University’s strategic plan,” Cibirka said. “It will be an integral part of the university’s globalization efforts. The institute will continue GRU’s footpath to achieve several organizational goals, such as becoming an internationally recognized leader in education, research, discovery, and scholarship by capitalizing on global partnerships.  These partnerships can enhance strategic areas of academic enrichment, research growth in biomedicine and the health services, as well as provide crucial wellness service to the local and global communities.”

Shanghai University of TCM, founded in 1956, is one of the first four colleges and universities of TCM established after the People’s Republic of China was founded. The university is located in the Scientific Research and Education Zone, ZhangJiang High-tech Park, Pudong New Area. It has 7,448 students, including over 1,000 short-term students from over 30 countries such as Japan, Korea, Russia, France, England, America, Germany and Italy who study at the university each year, and more than 600 specialists and professors.

The GRU Confucius Institute is premised on creating a highly visible and sustainable Confucius Institute with three distinct goals: 1) establish a comprehensive academic center for advancing the study of Chinese language and culture, 2) enhance multicultural awareness through a Chinese language and cultures program aimed at youth through adults in the broad Augusta community, and 3) provide Chinese language and culture instruction targeted to health professionals. These goals will showcase the GRU Confucius Institute as an international, one-of a kind resource center linked with an academic health center.  The SUTCM-GRU partnership will also develop a museum showcasing TCM exhibits.  A GRU Confucius Institute grand opening will be in approximately six months.

Dr. Joe Tsien, Co-Director of the Brain and Behavior Discovery Institute at Medical College of Georgia and MCG Professor of Neurology, will serve as the founding Director of the GRU Confucius Institute.

“The successful application and in a record time is a clear testimony to the visionary leadership and enormous strength of this great university and our Chinese partnership university,” Tsien said. “With close to almost 400 Confucius Institutes established to date world-wide, we are very proud that GRU receives this high distinction to be the very first Confucius Institute in North and South America to have the specialty education and training in Traditional Chinese Medicine.  This fits so well with the University’s roles in seeking excellence in education and research, including in the emerging area of alternative medicine.”

GRU will receive matching funds from the Confucius Headquarter, known as Hanban, from Beijing of the People’s Republic of China.

Gary Tom, President of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, echoes the views of Dr. Ray Rufo, Past President of the CCBA, about the local benefits of the new GRU Confucius Institute.

“On behalf of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, we would like to extend our congratulations and appreciation to Dr. Azziz and his leadership team in pursuing and obtaining a Confucius Institute designation for GRU,” Tom said. “Augusta’s Chinese community has always taken pride in being an active member of our community, sharing our culture and maintaining our traditions.  We are ecstatic that the Confucius Institute will be available to provide more robust and diverse resources to the community.  We are excited about what the Confucius Institute means for GRU and its academic programs. We are equally excited about the opportunities and benefits that the Confucius Institute will bring to our educational, business, and cultural community, and we are extremely excited in what this means for our own children in the Chinese community to help them better learn about their rich heritage.”

GRU pumps $1.8 billion into local economy

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Augusta’s consolidated university has a nearly $2 billion economic impact on the local economy, according to a recent report.

A study released by the Selig Center for Economic Growth reported that Georgia Health Sciences and Augusta State universities, now Georgia Regents University, pumped $1.8 billion into the local economy and generated a combined 19,192 jobs in fiscal year 2012. This is up $780 million from 2011, when the two universities reported a combined impact of $1.02 billion.

“An academic health center is a powerful economic engine,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “As Georgia’s fourth comprehensive research university with an aligned and integrated health system, we make a tremendous impact on the state’s bottom line. Our biomedical and academic enterprises produce three important benefits – qualified graduates, renowned discoveries, and positive patient outcomes – for the Augusta community and our state.”

The 2012 data reflects the combined impact of GRU’s academic and clinical initiatives, including campuses in Albany, Savannah, Rome, and the GRU/UGA Medical Partnership in Athens. Impact for those communities is estimated at $1,107,754 in Albany, $891,343 in Savannah, $573,757 in Rome, and $22,291,568 in Athens.

The report does not include an assessment of the economic activities of Georgia Regents Medical Associates, the faculty practice group aligned with the university and health system.

The study showed that the University System of Georgia’s 31 institutions made a $14.1 billion total impact on the state’s economy in 2012, up $900 million from 2011; and generated nearly 139,263 full- and part-time jobs, or 3.6 percent of all jobs in Georgia.

“Even in the worst economic times in a generation or two, our colleges and universities proved to be strong pillars and drivers of the economies of their host communities,” added Dr. Jeffrey M. Humphreys, Director of the Selig Center and author of the report. “That’s due to rising demand for higher education regardless of the overall economic climate.”

When compared to its peers, GRU placed third in total impact behind the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech with impacts of $2.6 billion and $2.2 billion, respectively.

“I am confident that we will generate additional impact across the state as our university and health system continue to grow,” Azziz said.

Read the full report at http://www.usg.edu/economic_development/documents/usg_Impact_fy2012.

GRU pumps $1.8 billion into local economy

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Augusta’s consolidated university has a nearly $2 billion economic impact on the local economy, according to a recent report.

A study released by the Selig Center for Economic Growth reported that Georgia Health Sciences and Augusta State universities, now Georgia Regents University, pumped $1.8 billion into the local economy and generated a combined 19,192 jobs in fiscal year 2012. This is up $780 million from 2011, when the two universities reported a combined impact of $1.02 billion.

“An academic health center is a powerful economic engine,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “As Georgia’s fourth comprehensive research university with an aligned and integrated health system, we make a tremendous impact on the state’s bottom line. Our biomedical and academic enterprises produce three important benefits – qualified graduates, renowned discoveries, and positive patient outcomes – for the Augusta community and our state.”

The 2012 data reflects the combined impact of GRU’s academic and clinical initiatives, including campuses in Albany, Savannah, Rome, and the GRU/UGA Medical Partnership in Athens. Impact for those communities is estimated at $1,107,754 in Albany, $891,343 in Savannah, $573,757 in Rome, and $22,291,568 in Athens.

The report does not include an assessment of the economic activities of Georgia Regents Medical Associates, the faculty practice group aligned with the university and health system.

The study showed that the University System of Georgia’s 31 institutions made a $14.1 billion total impact on the state’s economy in 2012, up $900 million from 2011; and generated nearly 139,263 full- and part-time jobs, or 3.6 percent of all jobs in Georgia.

“Even in the worst economic times in a generation or two, our colleges and universities proved to be strong pillars and drivers of the economies of their host communities,” added Dr. Jeffrey M. Humphreys, Director of the Selig Center and author of the report. “That’s due to rising demand for higher education regardless of the overall economic climate.”

When compared to its peers, GRU placed third in total impact behind the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech with impacts of $2.6 billion and $2.2 billion, respectively.

“I am confident that we will generate additional impact across the state as our university and health system continue to grow,” Azziz said.

Read the full report at http://www.usg.edu/economic_development/documents/usg_Impact_fy2012.

GRU students to offer free health screenings at local nursery

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Health sciences students at Georgia Regents University will offer free health screenings at the 8th Annual Costa Layman Health Fair from 7:30 a.m. to noon Friday, July 19 in Trenton, S.C. The health fair is organized by the GRU College of Nursing, under the leadership of Dr. Pam Cromer, and is sponsored by the college’s Clinical Nurse Leader program, with support from the Colleges of Dental Medicine, Allied Health Sciences, and the Medical College of Georgia. New this year is the development of a relationship with Dr. Yanbin Dong, Dr. Jigar Bhagatwala, and others in the Georgia Prevention Center’s “Public Health Collaborative Partnership” for ongoing population health assessments.

Approximately 340 Costa Layman employees will receive free health assessments, including lab work, dental screenings, and screenings for height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, vision, dental, skin, grip strength testing, heel bone density, sleep apnea screening, pulmonary function, and exhaled nitric oxide.

Multidisciplinary student led screenings will be directed by GRU’s multiprofessional faculty teams. Other faculty will include Dr. Andrew Mazzoli and Dr. Carol Hanes who have worked with the health fair for many years. In addition, Dr. Miriam Cortez-Cooper and her students will be screening for hand/grip strength, and Dr. Mariana D’Amico will be instructing workers on good body mechanics and proper lifting and bending. GRU Librarian Peter Shipman will distribute handouts on various health disparities. With a focus on health prevention, students and faculty will provide group and individual health education and counseling sessions specific to screening booths.

“Over the last eight years, the Costa Layman Health Fair has performed nearly 2,500 health screenings,” said Debbie Layman, Manager at Costa Layman Farms, one of the largest perennial farms in the United States. “The glucose, cholesterol, and vitamin D screenings are simple tests that can empower employees to make decisions that will positively impact their future health.”

“This event is very engrained in the culture of the nursery,” Layman said. “The Health Fair gives us an opportunity to benefit our employees by offering comprehensive health screenings while they are at the work site. Many people, who work at Costa Layman did not grow up with regular health care, do not know how to navigate the health care system or are afraid of going to the doctor. The health care professionals providing the screenings are some of the most highly regarded in our area and over the years have built a relationship of trust and confidence with our employees. The screenings offered provide both peace of mind that all is well or that information needed to make educated choices about how to seek the proper health care solution will be received. This Health Fair shows the impact a collaboration between a university and a private employer can have when partnering together to provide high quality health care and resources in the work setting.”

The GRU Ryan White Program, led by David Thompson, will return for the eighth year and share results from HIV testing with farm workers, most of whom are Spanish speaking. Certified Translators, led by Vivian Rice in the Department of Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services at GRU, will serve as on-site interpreters. The Georgia Prevention Center at GRU and St. Vincent De Paul Health Clinic will perform additional lab work and provide referrals to appropriate medical professionals for follow up. Other organizations participating in the health fair will include Carolina Health Centers, Inc. of McCormick, SC, Eye Care One & Eye Care One Laser Vision Center of Augusta.

This “Academic-Community Partnership Model” is key in GRU’s outreach programs throughout the university. It is a premier example of how a multidisciplinary healthcare workforce can approach our communities and businesses and demonstrate the capacity to work collaboratively with health teams to efficiently extend needed health services to populations and communities. With a movement toward healthier communities, the delivery of primary care to work sites and communities has far reaching implications for improving the health of our populations and the education of our future healthcare workforce.

GRU students to offer free health screenings at local nursery

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Health sciences students at Georgia Regents University will offer free health screenings at the 8th Annual Costa Layman Health Fair from 7:30 a.m. to noon Friday, July 19 in Trenton, S.C. The health fair is organized by the GRU College of Nursing, under the leadership of Dr. Pam Cromer, and is sponsored by the college’s Clinical Nurse Leader program, with support from the Colleges of Dental Medicine, Allied Health Sciences, and the Medical College of Georgia. New this year is the development of a relationship with Dr. Yanbin Dong, Dr. Jigar Bhagatwala, and others in the Georgia Prevention Center’s “Public Health Collaborative Partnership” for ongoing population health assessments.

Approximately 340 Costa Layman employees will receive free health assessments, including lab work, dental screenings, and screenings for height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, vision, dental, skin, grip strength testing, heel bone density, sleep apnea screening, pulmonary function, and exhaled nitric oxide.

Multidisciplinary student led screenings will be directed by GRU’s multiprofessional faculty teams. Other faculty will include Dr. Andrew Mazzoli and Dr. Carol Hanes who have worked with the health fair for many years. In addition, Dr. Miriam Cortez-Cooper and her students will be screening for hand/grip strength, and Dr. Mariana D’Amico will be instructing workers on good body mechanics and proper lifting and bending. GRU Librarian Peter Shipman will distribute handouts on various health disparities. With a focus on health prevention, students and faculty will provide group and individual health education and counseling sessions specific to screening booths.

“Over the last eight years, the Costa Layman Health Fair has performed nearly 2,500 health screenings,” said Debbie Layman, Manager at Costa Layman Farms, one of the largest perennial farms in the United States. “The glucose, cholesterol, and vitamin D screenings are simple tests that can empower employees to make decisions that will positively impact their future health.”

“This event is very engrained in the culture of the nursery,” Layman said. “The Health Fair gives us an opportunity to benefit our employees by offering comprehensive health screenings while they are at the work site. Many people, who work at Costa Layman did not grow up with regular health care, do not know how to navigate the health care system or are afraid of going to the doctor. The health care professionals providing the screenings are some of the most highly regarded in our area and over the years have built a relationship of trust and confidence with our employees. The screenings offered provide both peace of mind that all is well or that information needed to make educated choices about how to seek the proper health care solution will be received. This Health Fair shows the impact a collaboration between a university and a private employer can have when partnering together to provide high quality health care and resources in the work setting.”

The GRU Ryan White Program, led by David Thompson, will return for the eighth year and share results from HIV testing with farm workers, most of whom are Spanish speaking. Certified Translators, led by Vivian Rice in the Department of Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services at GRU, will serve as on-site interpreters. The Georgia Prevention Center at GRU and St. Vincent De Paul Health Clinic will perform additional lab work and provide referrals to appropriate medical professionals for follow up. Other organizations participating in the health fair will include Carolina Health Centers, Inc. of McCormick, SC, Eye Care One & Eye Care One Laser Vision Center of Augusta.

This “Academic-Community Partnership Model” is key in GRU’s outreach programs throughout the university. It is a premier example of how a multidisciplinary healthcare workforce can approach our communities and businesses and demonstrate the capacity to work collaboratively with health teams to efficiently extend needed health services to populations and communities. With a movement toward healthier communities, the delivery of primary care to work sites and communities has far reaching implications for improving the health of our populations and the education of our future healthcare workforce.

Lefebvre named Interim Dean of College of Dental Medicine

Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre, Vice Dean of the College of Dental Medicine, has been named the Interim Dean.

Lefebvre will serve while a search process to replace former Dean Connie Drisko is underway. Drisko, who served as Dean for a decade, stepped down in June.

“It’s the start of a new journey for the College of Dental Medicine,” Lefebvre said. “The College of Dental Medicine has a strong core and a bright future. We have achieved amazing growth already, and we can be proud of the 40-year history we have of educating dentists for the state of Georgia and in regions beyond our state borders. There is no doubt we have some challenges ahead of us, but I’m looking forward to keeping us moving in an upward direction.”

Lefebvre has several goals in mind, including more effective internal and external communication, strengthening faculty and staff development, and engaging students via social media.

A Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology, she has also served the college as Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Faculty Affairs.

Lefebvre received her Doctor of Dental Surgery and Master of Science degrees in Prosthodontics from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

Also a researcher, she is the co-principal investigator on the $6.2 million Nobel Biocare/GRU Center of Excellence grant, a research, clinical and educational grant related to implants and esthetic dentistry. She served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry for nine years after serving four years as the Associate Editor.

Lefebvre is a recipient of the College of Dental Medicine’s Excellence in Teaching and Outstanding Faculty Member Awards. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics; a Fellow of the Academy of Prosthodontics, American College of Prosthodontists, and Pierre Fauchard Academy; and a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, and the Hinman Dental Society.

She was a fellow in the 2005-06 Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program, and was recently honored by the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics, which named their Scientific Poster Award in honor of her tenure as Editor.

Lefebvre named Interim Dean of College of Dental Medicine

Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre
Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre, Vice Dean of the Georgia Regents University College of Dental Medicine, has been named the Interim Dean.

Lefebvre will serve while a search process to replace former Dean Connie Drisko is underway. Drisko, who served as Dean for a decade, stepped down in June.

“It’s the start of a new journey for the College of Dental Medicine,” Lefebvre said. “The College of Dental Medicine has a strong core and a bright future. We have achieved amazing growth already, and we can be proud of the 40-year history we have of educating dentists for the state of Georgia and in regions beyond our state borders. There is no doubt we have some challenges ahead of us, but I’m looking forward to keeping us moving in an upward direction.”

Lefebvre has several goals in mind, including more effective internal and external communication, strengthening faculty and staff development, and engaging students via social media.

A Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology, she has also served the college as Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Faculty Affairs.

Lefebvre received her Doctor of Dental Surgery and Master of Science degrees in Prosthodontics from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

Also a researcher, she is the co-principal investigator on the $6.2 million Nobel Biocare/GRU Center of Excellence grant, a research, clinical and educational grant related to implants and esthetic dentistry. She served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry for nine years after serving four years as the Associate Editor.

Lefebvre is a recipient of the College of Dental Medicine’s Excellence in Teaching and Outstanding Faculty Member Awards. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics; a Fellow of the Academy of Prosthodontics, American College of Prosthodontists, and Pierre Fauchard Academy; and a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, and the Hinman Dental Society.

She was a fellow in the 2005-06 Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program, and was recently honored by the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics, which named their Scientific Poster Award in honor of her tenure as Editor.

Lefebvre named Interim Dean of College of Dental Medicine

Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre
Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre

AUGUSTA, Ga. – Dr. Carol A. Lefebvre, Vice Dean of the Georgia Regents University College of Dental Medicine, has been named the Interim Dean.

Lefebvre will serve while a search process to replace former Dean Connie Drisko is underway. Drisko, who served as Dean for a decade, stepped down in June.

“It’s the start of a new journey for the College of Dental Medicine,” Lefebvre said. “The College of Dental Medicine has a strong core and a bright future. We have achieved amazing growth already, and we can be proud of the 40-year history we have of educating dentists for the state of Georgia and in regions beyond our state borders. There is no doubt we have some challenges ahead of us, but I’m looking forward to keeping us moving in an upward direction.”

Lefebvre has several goals in mind, including more effective internal and external communication, strengthening faculty and staff development, and engaging students via social media.

A Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology, she has also served the college as Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Faculty Affairs.

Lefebvre received her Doctor of Dental Surgery and Master of Science degrees in Prosthodontics from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

Also a researcher, she is the co-principal investigator on the $6.2 million Nobel Biocare/GRU Center of Excellence grant, a research, clinical and educational grant related to implants and esthetic dentistry. She served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry for nine years after serving four years as the Associate Editor.

Lefebvre is a recipient of the College of Dental Medicine’s Excellence in Teaching and Outstanding Faculty Member Awards. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics; a Fellow of the Academy of Prosthodontics, American College of Prosthodontists, and Pierre Fauchard Academy; and a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, and the Hinman Dental Society.

She was a fellow in the 2005-06 Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program, and was recently honored by the American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics, which named their Scientific Poster Award in honor of her tenure as Editor.