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DCH affirms Columbia County hospital decision

The following email was sent on Sunday, September 27, to members of the GRU and GRHealth community by Shawn Vincent, vice president of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Dear Colleagues,

We have some exciting news to share with you regarding our Columbia County hospital project.

Today we learned that the Georgia Department of Community Health affirmed its decision to grant Georgia Regents Medical Center a Certificate of Need to build a 100-bed hospital in Columbia County.

As you may remember, after the Department’s November 2014 decision to issue the CON to Georgia Regents, both University and Doctors hospitals filed appeals with DCH contesting the decision. This DCH decision answers those appeals.

We applaud the team at DCH for the time, care and effort that they’ve invested in evaluating the health care needs of Columbia County’s citizens and in choosing the most appropriate provider to meet those needs.

We are confident that our proposal is the most comprehensive and forward-thinking, and that by leveraging equipment and IT solutions that our health care partners Philips and Cerner have not yet made widely available, Columbia County could soon lay claim to the most technologically advanced hospital in the nation.

If there is no further opposition to the Certificate of Need, we will work to finalize the purchase of the building site in Grovetown so that we can begin construction.

We are committed to building a community teaching hospital and health care campus that will contribute to the economic, social, cultural and physical health and wellness of the residents of Columbia County and its neighbors.

We appreciate all of you for supporting our efforts, and we remain confident that we will soon move this project forward.

Kindest regards,

Shawn P. Vincent, Sr.
Vice President of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Don’t Believe Miss Liberty – A Talk with Edgar Heap of Birds

In the national conversation on racial inequity, one group is continuously left on the sideline-those who were here first. Given that Native Americans precedently inhabited America, one would think their inalienable rights should at least match those of any settlers. But as history demonstrates, they don’t.

To read more of Department of Art Chair Scott Thorp’s eye-opening interview with Cheyenne artist Edgar Heap of Birds in Art Pulse Magazine, click here.

Beat the Bug: Get your flu shot early

FluShotNo matter how the years come and go, flu season always seems to sneak up on us. This year, get the jump on the bug by getting your flu shot as early as possible. You (and your co-workers and classmates) will be glad you did.

To view a listing of flu shot clinics, see the schedule below:

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 14 Sept. 15 Sept. 16 Sept. 17 Sept. 18
Open Flu season

 

 

Satellite Clinic

8:00am to 11:00am

 

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 21 Sept. 22 Sept. 23 Sept. 24 Sept. 25
Georgia War Veteran’s Nursing Home

7 a.m.-
10 a.m.

Pharm. D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Sept. 28 Sept. 29 Sept. 30 Oct. 1 Oct. 2
Georgia War Veteran’s Nursing Home

7 a.m. – 10a.m.

Pharm. D

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm. D

Annex

GRMA Benefits fair

8 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm. D

Kick Off -Cafeteria

Terrace Dining

9 a.m. –
2 p.m.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 5 Oct. 6 Oct. 7 Oct. 8 Oct. 9
Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 12 Oct.13 Oct. 14 Oct. 15 Oct. 16
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 19 Oct. 20 Oct. 21 Oct. 22 Oct. 23
Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Oct. 26 Oct. 27 Oct. 28 Oct. 29 Oct. 30
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 2 Nov. 3 Nov. 4 Nov. 5 Nov. 6
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

7 a.m. –
10 a.m.

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 9 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 Nov. 12 Nov. 13
 

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Nov. 16 Nov. 17 Nov. 18 Nov. 19 Nov. 20
Magnolia Room

Cafeteria

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

Satellite Clinic

Location BA1343

8 a.m. –
11 a.m.

Pharm D

 

A dietitian’s perspective: The struggle with malnutrition

Malnutrition Awareness Week takes place from Sept. 28 to Oct. 2.

In response, the following article was contributed by Carly Moss, an inpatient clinical dietitian at GRHealth:

For the past few decades, evidence of America’s battle against obesity has been everywhere. It has galvanized health care professionals and researchers into action, instigated new government programs and served as a hot topic in the media. But more recently, another battle that is just as crucial to the health and wellbeing of millions of Americans has started to gain attention.

Malnutrition is a foreign concept to many – something almost unheard of in this country in this day and age – but in reality, it is a burden within our very own communities. Every day malnutrition impairs quality of life, increases health care costs and hinders patient recovery from illness and injury. The belief that malnutrition is a non-issue in our country is just one of the many myths surrounding this topic. Here are some other misconceptions to consider:

Myth: All Americans have access to a good food supply.

Simply put, malnutrition is imbalanced nutrition, whether it’s an imbalance in protein and caloric intake or in vitamin and mineral intake. Unfortunately, many Americans live in environments that are conducive to imbalanced nutrition. According to a 2011 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Richmond County alone has six food deserts, defined as areas that lack access to affordable, healthy foods. People living in such areas may struggle with maintaining balanced nutrition, which can ultimately lead to nutrient deficiencies and even malnutrition. Although poor food accessibility is a risk factor for malnutrition, it is actually not the primary one. This leads to another common misconception about malnutrition.

Myth: Food insecurity is the main culprit in malnutrition.

This may be true in parts of the world where food insecurity is widespread rather than isolated in food deserts. In the United States, however, injury and illness are the major contributors to malnutrition. Those of us who work in a hospital setting know that malnutrition is prevalent among those struggling with various chronic illnesses, including cancer, liver cirrhosis, kidney disease and severe gastrointestinal disorders to name just a few. Malnutrition is also not uncommon among patients with major trauma and injury. In fact, studies have shown anywhere from 20-50 percent of hospitalized patients are malnourished. The development of malnutrition is often multifactorial. These patients have increased protein and caloric needs due to chronic inflammation, wounds, malabsorption and hypermetabolism. At the same time, food intake tends to be poor due to food intolerances, inability to prepare foods or feed oneself, chewing and swallowing difficulty, depression or a combination of these factors. Over an extended period of time, these factors can ultimately result in malnutrition.

Myth: Malnutrition is easy to recognize.

Many people visualize malnutrition as wasting and atrophy to the point of a skeletal appearance, but malnutrition is rarely so obvious or dramatic. In fact, malnutrition can occur in people who are normal weight and overweight as well as those who are underweight. Diagnosing malnutrition requires physical examination to look for muscle and fat loss in certain areas of the body as well as a thorough assessment of body weight history, nutrient intake, gastrointestinal symptoms and functional capabilities. There is no foolproof lab test that acts as a marker for malnutrition, making the condition even harder to recognize.

Myth: Malnutrition is easy to treat.

Recommending increased food intake is rarely sufficient for treating malnutrition. As mentioned previously, most malnourished individuals already face many obstacles to meeting their nutrient needs. The challenge may be even greater if the malnourished individual lives in a food desert with poor access to healthy foods. It takes a multidisciplinary team to develop a nutrition plan appropriate for a malnourished patient, execute the plan and monitor progress. Some malnourished patients may require artificial nutrition support, which can be given through feeding tubes or as an intravenous infusion. In other cases, a malnourished individual may need to change the types of foods they are eating rather than the amount. There is hardly ever a simple, one-time solution for malnutrition. Just as malnutrition takes time to develop, it also takes time and effort to resolve.

Good nutrition is a vital aspect of recovery and healing, but it can also be very difficult to maintain for those dealing with illness and injury. This presents a challenge for these individuals as well as the family members and health care professionals caring for them. The first step to addressing the challenge is awareness of malnutrition and its risk factors and recognizing its presence within our own community.

Malnutrition is a burden to those who struggle with it, but the good news is that with the right plan of care, it can be managed and even reversed. In many cases, food and nutrition can truly act as medicine by improving quality of life, restoring strength and functional capabilities and aiding healing and recovery. The challenge is real, but in Augusta and across the country our health care professionals are equipped better than ever to help patients and their families meet it.

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Carly Moss is an inpatient clinical dietitian at GRHealth where she works with a variety of patient populations. Her interests include nutrition support therapy, nutrition in critical illness, and education. She was recently voted Preceptor of the Year for the Augusta Area Dietetic Internship.

GRU faculty and staff give big for IGRU

It’s safe to say GRU faculty and staff have more than risen to the challenge set forth by last year’s IGRU campaign.

So far, we have surpassed our goal of $325,000 by raising a total of $326,519.09 – a 24 percent increase in giving from this time last year.

On Friday, Sept. 11 faculty and staff celebrated that success with a sweet treat from Kona Ice. The Community portion of the campaign kicked off on Thursday, Sept. 17 with a luncheon at the Augusta Country Club and will continue through Oct. 9.

Still want to give? There are plenty of ways left to contribute. From now until the end of the IGRU campaign, you  can still make a gift at giving.gru.edu/IGRU.

You can also give by joining us at one of the following events:

GRUB for GRU  – Thursday, Sept. 24
IGRU Alumni BBQ & Celebration – Friday, Oct. 9
Jaguar Jaunt 5K – Saturday, Oct. 10

In the meantime, if you’re thinking about giving, enjoy this special message from President Brooks Keel.

Kinesiology Pro Consult app wins gold

Kinesiology Pro Consult, an app developed by a team that included members of the Occupational Therapy and the Instructional Design and Development departments at Georgia Regents University, won gold in the EdTech category of the Design 100 2015 App Design Awards.

The Kinesiology Pro Consult was developed as a visual guide and resource for OT students and clinicians to learn and review how to accurately measure joint range of motion in clinic and for exams. Users are able to see the movement being measured in a clinical setting, highlighting goniometer placement as well as the prime muscles involved by utilizing an animated 3-D skeleton. Users can see the musculature and anatomy within the body that they typically would not be able to see while attending their patients.

The team included Lynsey Ekema, 3-D design, medical illustration and animation; Timmy White, IOS developer; Jason Hughes, content advisor and Aaron Burkhart, interface design.

The Kinesiology Pro Consult fulfills a need by allowing students to visualize anatomy and the correct use of goniometer placement through interactions with 3-D models and video.

The app is available on the iPhone and iPad, and in the five months that the Kinesiology Pro Consult app has been released, it has been downloaded over 6,000 times in over 25 countries.

Grub for GRU on Sept. 24

Mark Your Calendars!

Thursday, September 24, 2015 is GRUB for GRU Day in Augusta.

Please make plans to eat at local participating restaurants on September 24 and 10% of all proceeds that day will be given back to our university as part of the IGRU campaign.

Get more info at https://giving.gru.edu/participating-grub-restaurants

Participating Restaurants include:

Ø  PeachWave Frozen Yogurt

Ø  FatMan’s Café

Ø  Firehouse Subs (Walton Way)

Ø  Buffalo Wild Wings

Ø  Wild Wings Café

Ø  Yo Pizza

Ø  Belair Doughnuts

Ø  Subway (Central Ave)

Ø  Beamie’s at the River

Ø  Pita Pit

Ø  Farmhaus Burger

Ø  Craft & Vine

Ø  Sunrise Grill (North Augusta)

Ø  Village Deli

Ø  Mellow Mushroom (Downtown)

Ø  Shane’s Rib Shack

Ø  Soy Noodle House

Ø  Atlanta Bread Company

Ø  Wifesaver (Furys Ferry and North Leg Rd)

Ø  The Pizza Joint (Downtown)

We look forward to seeing everyone eating out this Thursday as we all GRUB for GRU!

Columbia County hospital update

The following email was sent on Monday, September 21, to members of the GRU and GRHealth community by Shawn Vincent, vice president of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to inform you that today the Superior Court of Georgia dismissed the lawsuit filed by Doctors Hospital challenging the validity of the Department of Community Health’s decision to grant a Certificate of Need to Georgia Regents Medical Center to build a 100-bed hospital in Columbia County.  Our plan includes the design of a state-of-the-art, high-touch, high-tech community hospital to meet the health and wellness needs of Columbia County and surrounding communities.

As you may recall, Doctors Hospital filed the lawsuit claiming that DCH acted outside its scope last November in granting the CON. In dismissing the case, the court said that Doctors had filed the suit prematurely since the administrative process at DCH has not concluded.

Today’s announcement is another positive step in our efforts in Columbia County.

We still await a final decision on the appeals filed to DCH by Doctors and University hospitals contesting the CON being awarded to us. Those hearings wrapped up in Atlanta in late June, and we hope to hear from DCH soon.

We remain confident in our efforts and in the Department of Community Health and its CON process.

While these hearings are time-consuming, they have given us additional opportunities to emphasize the unique attributes of our plan – including choosing Grovetown as the location and capitalizing on our expertise in trauma and medical education.

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank you again for your continued support. This entire process would not have been possible without our dedicated faculty and staff and the involvement of the community.

We will continue to keep you informed as we take the steps to move our Columbia County hospital project forward.

Sincerely,

Shawn P. Vincent, Sr.

Vice President of Partnerships, International Healthcare and Strategic Affiliations

Register now for the Jaguar Jaunt

Whether you’re training for a marathon, looking for competition or just interested in a family-friendly run, join us on Saturday, Oct. 10 for the 2015 Jaguar Jaunt 5K.

Part of the IGRU campaign, this run will help support the areas of greatest need within the Georgia Regents University system.

Race registration begins at 7 a.m. at the Maxwell House on the Summerville Campus. The race itself starts at 8 a.m.

GRU student registration is $15. For the rest of the community, registration is $25 before Oct. 4 and $30 from Oct.4 to race day. All forms of registration include a race t-shirt.

For more information, including a link to register online, visit the Jaguar Jaunt site by clicking here.